Watch Phish’s Performance Of “Exile On Main St” With Sharon Jones, Horn Section

first_imgJust months after Phish reunited, the band made their way to the Empire Polo Ground in Indio, CA for Festival 8. Not only was it Phish’s first festival since reforming, but the festival also included a performance on Halloween night. The anticipation rose as fans guessed what Phish would pull out for their musical costume set, and the band defied expectations with a full performance of The Rolling Stones’ pivotal 1972 album, Exile On Main St.To properly recreate the album, the band brought on a three-piece horn section, with Dave Guy on trumpet, David Smith on trombone, and Tony Jarvis on saxophone, as well as vocalists Sharon Jones and Saundra Williams. From “Rocks Off” through “Soul Survivor” and everything in between, the soul-drenched rock album serves as a classic moment in Phish history.In honor of Ms. Sharon Jones today, set aside some time to watch Phish rock out Exile On Main St.You can also watch some selected footage from this show as well, including “Loving Cup” and the final song of the performance, an encore rendition of “Suzy Greenberg” with horns and vocal accompaniment. Setlist (via Phish.net):SET 1: Sample in a Jar, Divided Sky, Lawn Boy, Kill Devil Falls, Bathtub Gin, The Squirming Coil, Runaway Jim > Possum, Run Like an Antelope[1]SET 2: Rocks Off[2] > Rip This Joint[2], Shake Your Hips[2], Casino Boogie[3], Tumbling Dice[4], Sweet Virginia[5], Torn and Frayed[3], Sweet Black Angel[2], Loving Cup[5], Happy[4], Turd on the Run[4], Ventilator Blues[4] -> I Just Want To See His Face[6] > Let It Loose[4], All Down the Line[4], Stop Breaking Down[4], Shine a Light[4], Soul Survivor[4]SET 3: Backwards Down the Number Line > Fluffhead > Ghost, When the Circus Comes, You Enjoy MyselfENCORE: Suzy Greenberg[5][1] Lyrics changed to “Been you to have any Coil?”[2] Phish debut; Dave Guy on trumpet, David Smith on trombone, and Tony Jarvis on saxophone.[3] Phish debut.[4] Phish debut; Sharon Jones and Saundra Williams on backup vocals, Dave Guy on trumpet, David Smith on trombone, and Tony Jarvis on saxophone.[5] Sharon Jones and Saundra Williams on backup vocals, Dave Guy on trumpet, David Smith on trombone, and Tony Jarvis on saxophone.[6] Phish debut; Sharon Jones and Saundra Williams on backup vocals.This show was part of the three-show Festival 8. Playbills were distributed on-site (beginning at 12:30 p.m., 8 hours in advance) confirming that the second set (the band’s “musical costume”) would be the Rolling Stones’ Exile on Main St. After Divided Sky, Trey acknowledged the beauty of the venue and announced that Page would now play a love song to the lawn since it was the first time they had played on grass in a long time. Antelope’s lyrics were changed to “Been you to have any Coil, man?” (The Coil was an art installation on the venue grounds.) Set 2 began with a video highlighting selections of the 99 classic albums displayed and then systematically eliminated on the phish.com web site leading up to the festival. Selections in the montage included snippets from Michael Jackson’s Thriller, T.Rex’s Electric Warrior, Metallica’s Master of Puppets, Miles Davis’s A Tribute to Jack Johnson, Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours and The Doors (self titled), among others. All of the Exile on Main St songs were Phish debuts, except for Loving Cup and Sweet Virginia. All songs in the second set except for Casino Boogie, Torn and Frayed, and I Just Want To See His Face featured Dave Guy on trumpet, David Smith on trombone, and Tony Jarvis on saxophone. Tumbling Dice, Sweet Virginia, and Loving Cup through Soul Survivor also featured Sharon Jones and Saundra Williams on backup vocals. Trey introduced the horn section after Tumbling Dice and again after the completion of the costume, before saying “We are the Rolling Stones. See you later.” Suzy Greenberg was played with Jones, Williams, and the horns. This show featured the first Sweet Virginia since September 26, 1999 (173 shows).last_img read more

Last Mile Ride raises $48,000 for end-of-life care

first_imgGifford Healthcare,Gifford Medical Center’s sixth annual Last Mile Ride held on Saturday, Aug. 20, attracted a record 219 motorcyclists, 23 cyclists and raised $48,000 for end-of-life care.The charity motorcycle ride was the Randolph hospital’s sixth annual. Since it’s start in 2006, rider numbers and money raised have climbed significantly. That first year just 74 riders turned out and $7,000 was raised.The leap in participation is due to word of mouth and support for the cause, according to hospital organizers. Gifford offers special care in a garden-side suite for patients at the end-of-life. The ride supports extra services for these patients and their families and also helps patients in advanced illness or choosing to die at home with special needs and last wishes.The steady climb in dollars raised for the cause is due to the support of sponsors, including many area businesses, and riders’ fund raising efforts. Riders who raise the most win prizes.This year rider Larry Richburg of Randolph took the top prize of a $300 gift card to Wilkins Harley-Davidson in South Barre after he collected more than $2,000 for the cause.‘I’m in the Rotary Club. I hit up everybody at Rotary. I think just about everybody in Rotary donated something. I also put a little something in the church bulletin at Bethany Church. I got a lot from people at the church. I sent an e-mail to my wife’s contact list for family and friends,’ says Richburg of how he was able to raise so much.There were also people who sought out Richburg. ‘I can’t believe the number of people who just call and say ‘I have a check for you.’ It kind of goes to show what kind of fund-raiser and project this is. You don’t find that very often.’Coming in second was Frank Drown of Northfield, who raised more than $1,700, and won a leather motorcycle jacket from Frank’s Motorcycle Sales and Service in Essex Junction.Drown’s daughter Naomi spent her final days in the Garden Room at Gifford before dying at home in 2008 at the age of 25. She had a rare cancer.Since, the tight-knit Drown family has made the Last Mile Ride an annual event. This year Frank rode with daughter Alicia, daughter Olivia drove a second bike and wife Sandra rode with a friend.For Sandra, the ride is a time of reflection and healing. ‘I just love it,’ she says.For Frank, who strives to be the first one registered for the ride each year and is relentless in his fund raising efforts, the ride, in part, is a chance to help other families as his was helped.‘The benefits received by the patients and families by this fund are not replaceable by words,’ he says, using his own experience as an example. ‘We have our memories. We have our conversations. But watching the CD of the photos set to music (the family received following their stay in the Garden Room), there’s nothing that can replace that. We have that forever. Not only that, but the people involved in the Garden Room, it’s a genuine care that this fund-raiser puts forth to the families and to the patients. It’s just overwhelming.‘My personal experiences with what this program gave me drive me. I could do this every year and never replace what I got out of it.’Ride founder Lynda McDermott of Randolph, a Gifford inpatient nurse, was also once again a top fund-raiser.‘I just feel a personal responsibility,’ McDermott says. ‘When a family goes through the death of a loved one, that creates a long-term memory. These memories never go away. It’s a memory that I want to be as positive as possible. Even though it’s a sad moment, there can be a joy in this. I’m trying to help these families cherish these last times with their loved ones.’Not all participants have had an experience with the Garden Room, of course. Participants this year came from as far away as Colorado, Connecticut and Maine. For the ride, the motorcyclists traveled 112 miles around central Vermont, assisted by a group of combat veterans, who served as road guards, and Orange County Sheriff Bill Bohnyak, who led the ride.Cyclists were also a part of this year’s ride. Last year, Gifford nurse Marci White did a 38.4 mile loop from Gifford to Northfield and back. This year, other cyclists were invited to join her on the same route and Green Mountain Bike Patrol helped cyclists along the route.The ride also included a Harley raffle again this year and the winner of the 2011 Iron 883 was Rochester’s Jay McGill-O’Rourke. A long-time motorcycle enthusiast, McGill-O’Rourke was clearly thrilled to win the new Harley.‘It’s the first thing I’ve won since I was in Cub Scouts, so that was 48 years ago,’ he said.McGill-O’Rourke has been riding since he was 15 and is into collectibles. The bike he rode in Saturday’s ride was a 1974 BMW. His newest bike is 1983 Honda. ‘This will put me back in the main stream,’ he says of the new Harley he’ll soon collect from Wilkins.A quilt made by Gifford staff went to Janet Whitacker of Stockbridge, who couldn’t ride this year but stopped Saturday to make a donation and buy raffle tickets.Organizers marveled at the outpouring of support from participants and non-participants alike.‘It always amazes me the amount of support we receive for our event. To know that so many people contribute their time, resources and energy to help others who they will probably never even meet is a humbling experience,’ said Ashley Lincoln, director of development, marketing and public relations at Gifford.Photo by Robin Palmer: Motorcyclists leave Gifford Medical Center in Randolph on Saturday for the start of the Last Mile Ride.Gifford Medical Center in Randolph, Vt., is a community hospital with family health centers in Bethel, Chelsea, Rochester and Sharon and specialty services throughout central Vermont. Gifford is a full-service hospital with a 24-hour emergency department, inpatient and rehabilitation units, a day care, an adult day care and a 30-bed nursing home, the Menig Extended Care Facility, which opened in 1998 on the main campus. The Birthing Center, established in 1977, was the first in Vermont to offer an alternative to the traditional hospital-based deliveries and continues to be a leader in midwifery and family-centered care.The hospital’s mission is to improve individuals’ and community health by providing and assuring access to affordable and high-quality health care in Gifford’s service area.Next year’s ride will be held on Aug. 18.last_img read more

PKA invests DKK1.3bn in Denmark’s biggest hospital PPP

first_imgPeter Damgaard Jensen, managing director of PKA, said: “This is unique and historic and clearly underlines the fact that, in Denmark, too, PPP projects are getting off the ground.”PKA said it had now invested in five healthcare sector buildings in Denmark, including this project.In March, PKA joined PensionDanmark and Sampension in a PPP deal worth DKK430m to build and operate a new psychiatric hospital in the city of Vejle.The hospital will be built in Skeiby, north of Aarhus, and form part of the New University Hospital (DNU) in Aarhus.PKA will supply financing for the 50,000m2 hospital building, while KPC will act as turnkey contractor and be responsible for construction, while Wicotec will operate the hospital for a 25-year term.Construction is set to start at the beginning of 2016, and the hospital is expected to be ready for use three years later.Arkitema is the architect for the project ,and the consulting engineer is Grontmij. Danish pensions administrator PKA is investing DKK1.3bn (€174m) in a new psychiatric hospital in Aarhus in the biggest public-private partnership (project) hospital project in Denmark so far.PKA, which manages five labour-market pension funds in the social and healthcare sectors, will finance the project in conjunction with KPC and Wicotec.The consortium of the three partners was chosen by the central Jutland municipality Region Midtjylland to run the hospital project, PKA said.With financing of DKK1.3bn, the PPP will be the biggest of its kind so far in Denmark, PKA said.last_img read more

Super Nationals Thursday Notebook

first_imgAll Modifieds and Stock Cars Thursday at Super NationalsBOONE, Iowa (Sept. 5) – Qualifying today at Boone Speedway will determine the front eight spots in the middle rows for Modified and Stock Car main events at the IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nationals fueled by Casey’s.Two qualifying features for both divisions will be on the program, as will all Harris Auto Racing Modified Race of Champions heats.Also on the Thursday card is the inaugural Karl Crate Clash.Racing starts at 3 p.m.*Stock Cars with community betterment/charitable organization themes will be on display begin­ning at 1 p.m. Thursday in the Fan Zone.Autograph sessions scheduled at the same location are at 4 p.m. for Wednesday Stock Car qualify­ing feature winners David Smith and Brandon Czarapata; at 5 p.m. for Wednesday Modi­fied qualifying feature winners Ricky Thornton Jr. and Chase Allen; and at 7 p.m. for former Modi­fied champions in attendance at Super Nationals.The drawing for starting spots on the Karl Crate Clash grid is at 6 p.m.*Qualifying feature winner Chase Allen didn’t decide to make his first tip to Boone until a couple weeks ago. It goes without saying he’s happy with the decision.“It’s been awesome. I’ll come back here every year if I can,” said Allen, from Midlothian, Texas. “Just to come to Boone and win my first time here has been great.”Still available for post-race interviews well after the checkers flew, Allen made the 750-mile trip wanting but not expecting to win so much so quickly.“I wanted to win it. That’s why you race,” he said. “Did I expect to win it (the qualifier) last night? No.”*last_img read more