Mumford & Sons Donate North Carolina Concert Proceeds To Local LGBTQ Organization

first_imgWith Bruce Springsteen making headlines for cancelling a performance in North Carolina over the controversial HB2 law, many artists scheduled to play in the state have been reconsidering their performances. Mumford & Sons took a more active approach to protesting the law, by not only playing a sold out show at the Time Warner Center Arena but donating their profits to a local organization that supports LGBTQ rights.Read the band’s full statement below:Dear friends,We will be playing a show tomorrow in Charlotte, and recent events in North Carolina have got us talking a lot as a band the last few days, so we felt compelled to say something in advance to you.As a band that relishes welcoming everyone to our shows and promoting tolerance, we do want to take a stand with the people of North Carolina who this week are shouting loudly against intolerance, fear and discrimination.Over the years we’ve looked for ways to contribute to the vitality of local communities and, in that spirit, we’re now creating a charitable fund to support those who have made it their mission to pursue love and justice. We will be donating all of our profits from this show to this new fund. And we will start by making a donation from it to a local LGBTQ organisation.As always, we will open the doors to our show to anyone who wants to come, and are excited to get down with the people of Charlotte.M, B, W & Tlast_img read more

Carpenter bees

first_imgTiny piles of sawdust found in random spots are likely caused by large wood-drilling insects called carpenter bees.Carpenter bees are large, black and yellow bees often seen flying around the wooden eaves of houses, wooden decks and wooden fences. They are often mistaken for bumblebees, but unlike bumblebees they have a black shiny tail section. Drilling half-inch holesThe carpenter bee got its name because of its ability to tunnel in wood with its jaws. The bees make half-inch round holes in wood.Sawdust can be found on the ground or on the surface of an object beneath the hole. The holes go a short distance into the wood and run horizontally with the grain for at least six inches or more.Several bees may use the same entrance hole and branch off in different directions from the main tunnel. The tunnels may go for several feet in the wood if the same entrance hole is used for several years.Trusses, overhangs, wooden decks and other exposed wood on houses attract the bees. Wood that is treated or painted is less preferred but still susceptible to attacks. They don’t eat woodUnlike termites, carpenter bees do not consume the wood as food. Instead, they gnaw tunnels to create nesting sites.Carpenter bees overwinter in tunnels. They emerge from these tunnels in early spring. Female bees lay eggs in the tunnels until the tunnels are full. Male bees do not drill tunnels, but they are protective of their territory. The male is distinguished from the female by a white spot on the front of the face. Female carpenter bees seldom sting but will if disturbed or handled. Male carpenter bees cannot sting, but they often become aggressive and frighten people by flying about their heads. Carpenter bee larvae are large and noisy. The noise they make may attract woodpeckers. The woodpeckers do further damage to wood when hunting for the larva. Woodpeckers seen on the eave of homes are more than likely in search of the carpenter bee larva.Adult bees die within a few weeks.Three control methods recommendedAt least three methods can be used to control carpenter bees: 1) aerosol treatments of insecticides applied directly to adult carpenter bees, 2) residual surface and gallery treatments with insecticides and 3) preventive treatments such as painting wood with thick coats of oil based or latex paints.Several days following the preferred treatment, after carpenter bee activity has ceased, plug holes with dowel rods, plastic wood, caulk or with other suitable materials. If carpenter bees continue to attack the wood, additional residual insecticide treatments may be required at weekly or twice weekly intervals. Painting the wood with an oil base or polyurethane paint will discourage the bees, but will not make the wood bee-proof.For more information on handling urban pests, contact your local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.last_img read more

Defensive lapses plague Syracuse in 4-0 loss to Duke

first_img“We knew that they were going to be pressing us before the game, but we didn’t execute our game plan as well as we had hoped to,” Tivnan said. “We really wanted to swing the ball around more, bounce it in and out of their shape … I think if we had stepped it up we could have broken them down more.”Heading into Sunday’s matchup, Syracuse knew all about Duke’s smothering pressure, Tivnan said. The Orange’s game plan was to swing the ball across the back line with pace to make the Blue Devils’ attackers chase, then bounce passes back-and-forth with the midfield to further stretch out the visitor’s midfield and attacking unit. But Tivnan said SU didn’t execute it.“They aren’t team issues,” Wheddon said. “It comes down to an individual decision at any point in time.” Published on September 16, 2018 at 6:11 pm Contact David: [email protected] Comments For 60 minutes, No. 13 Duke had outplayed Syracuse in every facet of the game. The Blue Devils were quicker, made more accurate passes and had converted their chances. Their dominance led to three goals before the hour mark.“More urgency, let’s go!” Wheddon yelled in the 62nd minute as SU chased after the ball. “Up, up, up! High press!”The command was the loudest Wheddon had been all game, and it triggered a response from the Orange. SU immediately applied high pressure to Duke’s back line, won the ball back and linked together six passes to generate a chance for Georgia Allen, who was tackled by Delaney Graham before she could get a shot off. Graham cleared the ball to SU defender Jenna Tivnan, who subsequently gave the ball away to cause a Duke counter-attack.No matter how hard the Orange worked or how many spurts of quality play it had, Duke tenaciously sought after the ball until it won it back. The Blue Devils (7-1-1, 1-0 Atlantic Coast) used a suffocating high press to force Syracuse (3-6, 0-1) into making errors all over the field en route to a 4-0 victory on Sunday afternoon at SU Soccer Stadium.All season long, SU has struggled to produce, scoring just six goals all season. When SU has conceded more than two goals, it’s always lost. When SU has competed, the defense has led the way.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDefensive lapses on and off the ball were a main factor in the Orange’s loss, Wheddon said. When SU was defending, it gave Duke’s midfielders and attackers too much time and space on the ball. When it won the ball back, lack of composure and the Blue Devils’ constant pressing led to turnovers. The cycle repeated continuously throughout the game as Syracuse struggled to maintain possession in Duke’s defensive half and the Blue Devils outshot the Orange 24-3.“We were a little bit frantic at times,” Wheddon said about SU building out from the back. “A few too many turnovers, and then you’re right back defending again. We need to be better on the ball, we need to move the ball a little quicker and with confidence.”Wheddon praised SU’s performance in the first 30 minutes, but two quick goals from Duke before halftime erased the Orange’s hopes of an upset victory.center_img With 11 minutes remaining in the first half, SU defender Taylor Bennett made two slide tackles in her own penalty area — both of which led to penalty claims from the Blue Devils — before Marykate McGuire skipped past a lunging Bennett to find Taylor Racioppi for Duke’s first goal.“It’s just a lack of focus,” Wheddon said.SU’s lack of urgency and slopiness in defense was not apparent throughout the whole game, but small doses of it led to trouble. With 32 minutes remaining, and the Orange already down by three goals, Bennett’s cross-field pass to Shannon Aviza was too strong. The ball got away from her and Duke’s Tess Boade swiped it, earning a corner kick on the other end.“We knew they were going to press us,” SU goalkeeper Lysianne Proulx said. “We tried to stay calm and get it out the back. Play long. I mean, obviously you could see we tried to play around (them).”After earning a second corner kick off the first one, the Blue Devils played a short pass that led to a cross into the penalty area. Duke defender Taylor Mitchell chested it into the ground and wide of the goal. As six SU defenders in the left-hand side of the box stood still, Mitchell chased down the ball and kept it inbounds before winning another corner kick, one of the visitor’s 12 in the game.Eleven minutes later, Duke forward Kayla McCoy, who caused problems all afternoon and is a “really good player,” Tivnan said, sunk the Orange into an even deeper hole. On another Duke corner kick, Bennett turned her back to McCoy, who snuck toward the near post to easily redirect Karlie Paschall’s cross into the back of the net. Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more