Business community to state their case for affordable rates

first_imgEmail Print Linkedin THE Limerick business community is urged to attend a meeting at the Strand Hotel on next Tuesday, June 28, at 6.30pm, to assist in the nationwide campaign to fight for fairer and affordable rates.Employers for Affordable Rates (E.A.R), the voluntary organisation established in April, is organising a series of regional mass meetings in response to requests from all over the country.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up To date, employers from six regions have begun organising local groups with the aim of creating a national organisation to lobby the Government.E.A.R has also received support from business, trade and professional bodies and is gathering tremendous support nationally.Many Limerick city centre business people have repeatedly told the Limerick Post that they are struggling to cope with rates.“It is particularly difficult at the present time- business is very quiet and people are not just spending as in the past,” said one. E.A.R objects to what they describe as an inequitable system that has made the level of rates genuinely unaffordable.Rates, which the commercial sector alone has to pay, is the only funding source for local government apart from the exchequer. Employers, they argue, want fair play and say that they don’t mind paying their fair share, but point out that rates have risen by 300% since 1980 and it is unreasonable to expect them to carry this burden since they pay taxes as well.E.A.R believe they can make a compelling case to Government that will enable them achieve fair and affordable rates. Twitter WhatsAppcenter_img Previous articleCastle plan based on Hollywood rather than authenticityNext articleCllrs. sing from same hymn sheet on Opera site admin NewsLocal NewsBusiness community to state their case for affordable ratesBy admin – June 23, 2011 587 Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

New tropical threat for Caribbean and Bahamas, heat wave continues for East Coast

first_imgABC NewsBy MAX GOLEMBO, ABC News(NEW YORK) — All eyes Tuesday morning are on the new tropical wave in the Atlantic moving towards the northern Caribbean islands for the end of the week. The National Hurricane Center has given a 90% chance in the next few days for this system to become a Tropical Depression or Tropical Storm Isaias.Most of them agree that this system, developed or not, will move near Puerto Rico by the end of the week and bring the island heavy rain, gusty winds and a threat for flash flooding. After that, the models take the system into the Bahamas over the weekend and somewhere off the Southeast U.S. coast sometime early next week. For now, most reliable models keep the system away from the U.S. mainland.A heat wave will continue for the East Coast with a Heat Advisory issued for 12 states from South Carolina all the way up to Maine. Already Monday, several records have been tied and broken from Maine down to North Carolina. Some of the records include Wilmington, Pennsylvania hitting 100 degrees, Hartford, Connecticut at 98 and Providence, Rhode Island, tying a record at 97 degrees. Elsewhere, Binghamton, New York, hit a record high of 97 degrees Monday making this the hottest temperature there in four years. In Washington, D.C., there were 25 days of 90 degrees or higher this month so far which ties for the most 90s ever recorded in the month of July. The area is expected to reach the 90s Tuesday as well and, if it does, it will officially break that record. On Tuesday, more heat and some humidity will make it feel like its near 100 degrees from Boston to Raleigh, North Carolina. There will be a cool front that will try to pass through the Northeast in the next 24 to 48 hours but not much relief is expected to come from it. More 90 degree temperatures are forecast for the next three days for most of the major Northeast cities too.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Men who were sexually abused by women tell their stories

first_imgNZ Herald 13 December 2016Family First Comment: The inconvenient truth ….“People seem to think being a male victim is not as bad as being a female victim and that if the perpetrator is a female the damage isn’t as bad not realising the psychological damage it can do and especially if that female is a mother. As in many countries males have been seen as perpetrators and not victims and our country is having trouble coming to terms with female perpetrators.”Aaron Gilmore was not even a teenager when he was sexually abused by a family friend he regarded as a second mother.But when he reported it to police years later they told him they couldn’t see what crime had taken place.Ken Clearwater was 12 years old when he said he was sexually violated by a woman and asked to do things he could never comprehend and was left scarred, ashamed and broken.He never reported that abuse or named the woman involved.Both men carried a deep shame for years, worried that police and society wouldn’t believe that they had been abused by women.Both men believe this is why males don’t report it.Female sex offendersWhile female sex offenders may seem rare, research released this month showed it’s a lot more common than previously thought.A survey in the US found that a similar amount of women reported being raped in a 12-month period as the amount of men who were “made to penetrate” a female offender.A new paper titled Sexual Victimisation Perpetrated by Women: Federal Data Reveal Surprising Prevalence, contradicts the idea that female sexual perpetration is rare.Researchers used data from four main surveys, including from the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, to reach their conclusion.Using CDC data, they found that women and men reported nearly equal rates of non-consensual sex in a 12-month period.It found 1.6 per cent of women in the US reported being raped in the past 12 months (1.9 million), which is a similar rate to the 1.7 per cent of men (1.9 million) who reportedly were “made to penetrate a perpetrator”.READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11765471last_img read more