Solicitor avoids conviction with €1,000 charity payment

first_imgAdvertisement NewsLocal NewsSolicitor avoids conviction with €1,000 charity paymentBy admin – October 23, 2012 473 Linkedin Print Facebook A PROMINENT Limerick solicitor has avoided a criminal conviction for assault after he made a donation of €1,000 to the Society of St Vincent de Paul. The facts of the case against 50-year-old John Devane, with a practice on Quinlan Street, had been earlier proven before Judge Patrick Clyne at Limerick District Court on June 9, 2011. Evidence was heard of how he had “thrown a headbutt” and grabbed fellow solicitor John Herbert  by the throat during “an exchange of words” outside Limerick District Court last year.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up John Herbert told the court of how he was assaulted by John Devane after he refused an offer to “forget about” an earlier incident between them two weeks earlier as he felt “it was not made in earnest”.  He said he had his hands in his pockets at all times and said it was “preposterous and a lie” that he pushed John Devane.The court heard that Mr Devane was irate and agitated and a witness, Paul O’Dwyer, saw the two standing in the foyer of the courthouse with Mr Devane saying “who do you think you are? You will not bully me like you did last week?”Mr Devane told the court that the relationship between the two was not “amicable” and there was a lot of tension between them.Judge Clyne said he was satisfied that something happened and that the assault occurred. He said he would dismiss the case if he made a €1,000 contribution to St Vincent de Paul before October 18 and last week, the court was notified that the payment had been made.After proceedings, State solicitor, Michael Murray said he had specific instructions from the DPP that the court should either convict Mr Devane and have the proceedings struck out or have the matter dismissed under the Probation Act.However, Judge Clyne said that the case was closed and he had made his decisioncenter_img Twitter WhatsApp Email Previous articleDrug driver banned for six yearsNext articleMan pleads guilty to dangerous driving resulting in death of 16-year-old adminlast_img read more

Spelt boom prompts non-organic Sharpham Park retail launch

first_imgSharpham Park has rolled out its first non-organic retail spelt flours following soaring demand during the coronavirus outbreak.The Somerset-based business, which grows and mills organic spelt on site, said interest in spelt had been growing ahead of the Covid-19 crisis but had soared tenfold in the months immediately following lockdown.“We grow our organic spelt on the farm and with our growers at least a year ahead,” explained Sharpham Park founder Roger Saul.“Over the last six months, even before Covid, we have been milling three times as much a month. In order not to run out before the new harvest we have supplemented our retail range with British-grown conventional spelt.”Historically, the business would have only supplied this in bulk to bakers but has developed 2.5kg wholegrain and white varieties to supply retail customers.“This is a great addition to our existing online product range, offering the same versatility as our organic products,” added Saul, who said consumers were increasingly turning to spelt for health benefits including being a source of fibre, protein, iron and vitamins.Spelt is an ancient grain that has been cultivated for more than 7,000 years. It fell out of favour in medieval times, according to Sharpham Park, and had a brief revival in the 19th century but interest waned in the 20th century as crops producing higher yields took over.Recently launches containing spelt include a Glorious Grains loaf from Hovis and a Spelt, Golden and Brown Linseed Seed Bread from Lovingly Artisan.Sharpham Park has also launched a 24-hour online booking platform for ordering its products, which also include spelt cereals, pasta and grains.last_img read more

Origin of Life: Can Peptides Form Naturally in Water?

first_img(Visited 518 times, 2 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Ross Anderson (PhD, biochemistry) is professor of biochemistry at The Master’s University in southern California. Dr Anderson’s expertise is in the area of biochemistry and molecular biology. He has taught Biochemistry and helped to direct research projects of graduate and medical students at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Dr. Anderson was a post-doctoral researcher Houston Neurosensory Center, and was a member of both the undergraduate and graduate faculty at Lamar University, Beaumont, TX. Dr Anderson’s research interests include structure-function studies of DNA polymerizing enzymes and the synthesis and expression of synthetic human genes in bacterial hosts. He has authored or co-authored several publications in major, peer-reviewed journals. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and Sigma Xi Research Society. Another Attempt to Leap Over an Origin-of-Life Hurdle Falls Flatby Ross Anderson, Ph.D.Well, here they go again, trying desperately to provide a glimmer of hope to those who insist that life arose by lifeless processes. Three evolutionists are proposing that you can get polypeptides to form in water without intelligent design. Their new proposal has been published in Nature.An essential part of the evolutionary hypothesis is that life allegedly arose in the ocean, in what is sometimes referred to as the “prebiotic soup.” The major problem is that, until now, no one could explain how polymers of amino acids or other biomolecules could form in the presence of water. In the cell, amino acids are polymerized by molecular machines that can deal with the loss of a molecule of water for each peptide bond formed. Outside a cell, though, if the concentration of water is high, such as in the ocean, the reverse reaction would be favored; i.e., breaking peptide bonds is greatly favored over peptide bond formation. As a consequence, several investigators have proposed other scenarios where the water problem would be avoided, but all of these scenarios are not without their own problems.Louis Pasteur, 1822-1895, proved the “law of biogenesis” – life begets life.Ideology Driving the ExperimentationIt must be borne in mind that all hypotheses as to the abiogenetic origins of life are based on the philosophical ideology that there is no Creator, or that, if there is one, he is not involved and thus had no hand in the process. Consequently, evolutionists depend on their creative imaginations to speculate as to how life may have originated from non-life. Mind you, this is in spite of experiments done long ago by Louis Pasteur and others who demonstrated that life only originates from life. Such speculations also have to propose that the laws of thermodynamics didn’t apply at the beginning.As with virtually all attempts to show that life could have arisen abiogenetically—no intelligence involved—there is a considerable amount of intelligence used to develop the scenario proposed here. What makes this proposal unique is that it examines a means whereby polymerization of amino acids can occur in the presence of water.Here are the details. The series of reactions proposed by these authors consists of three reactions, what they refer to as the “ligation cycle.” It starts with a thiolysis reaction followed by a hydrolysis reaction. The authors start with a short N-acetylated peptide with a nitrile function on the C-terminus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is used to displace the nitrile group from the N-acetyled peptide and, in the presence of water, generate an aminoacylthioacid. This thioacid is then set for the third reaction, an oxidation reaction, whereby the thioacid function is replaced by a nitrile derivative of an amino acid (aminonitrile); the next amino acid is ligated onto the C-terminus of the acetylated peptide. The peptide is thus extended by one amino acid and possess a nitrile function and activated for the next round of reactions.And yet these reactions will not spontaneously occur without copious amounts of investigator interference (i.e., intelligent design by lab workers pushing results in non-natural directions). Some examples of significant investigator input are as follows:First, all polymerization reactions in the cell require that the monomers being polymerized first be activated. In the case of protein synthesis, each amino acid is activated by attachment to a tRNA [transfer RNA]. The authors postulate some molecules could have been available in the prebiotic soup, such as ferricyanide, H2S, thioacetate, and cyanoacetylene. From that assumption, the authors concluded that formation of aminonitriles (amino acids with a nitrile function in place of the α-carboxyl group, AA-CN) would be likely. However, it was known that these do not lend themselves to efficient ligation or polymerization. They figured that if they could convert the AA-CN to an aminothioacid (AA-SH) which is stable and soluble in water, polymerization/ligation efficiency might be improved. The thiolysis and the hydrolysis reactions were shown to efficiently convert an AA-CN to an AA-SH. This, in turn, could participate in efficient ligation/polymerization of the next AA-CN to the C-terminus, and at the same time activate the -CN moiety for the next series of reactions in the cycle. [Note: moiety refers to an indefinite portion or share.]Second, the authors found that they first had to modify the peptide with an acetyl group on the N-terminus for several reasons: (1) Without the acetyl group, they were not able to observe the generation of the aminoacylthioacid by the hydrolysis reaction, and thus no ligation would be observed. (2) Without an N-acetyl group on the N-terminus of the growing peptide, it would be progressively destroyed by the activating agent diketopiperazine (DKP). (3) Addition of the acetyl group to the α-amino group of the peptide helped to activate the nitrile moiety making it amenable to thiolysis by H2S.Third, the authors start with short, pre-formed acetylated-peptides of glycine (Ac-Gly1-6-CN) to which they investigated the ligation of single aminonitriles, or pre-formed tripeptides. The amino acids used were all purified L-amino acids which doesn’t reflect the prebiotic soup conditions where a racemic mixture of both D- and L-amino acids would have existed. Unfortunately, the authors didn’t appear to investigate whether there is a limit to the iterative ligations after which yield drops significantly. This is important because the average number of amino acids in proteins today is 400-450 amino acids, with many being much longer. To get around this, some speculate that the first proteins were smaller; again, this is pure speculation. If that were the case, then what would be the advantage of making larger, more complex proteins?Fourth, the authors used ferricyanide to add the nitrile moiety to the amino acids, however, both ferricyanide and H2S are highly reactive toward each other, thus they had to be added in separate, sequential steps to achieve the results reported. Of course, in the prebiotic soup these two reagents would have been mixed together, thus compromising the results reported here.Getting the Sequence RightAs one can see, there was significant investigator involvement. Even if there wasn’t, this would not prove evolution. In all proteins there is information contained within the specific amino acid sequence, and this information is contained in the nucleic acid, DNA. It’s not enough to propose a scheme that may provide some plausible means for the abiotic synthesis of peptides. The scheme must have a way of specifying the sequence. It is the specific amino acid sequence that determines the 3-D conformation and thus function of a protein. One has to be mindful that the specific amino acid sequence in these experiments is determined by the investigators— not nature.The authors believe their work can inform theories about the origin of life:Amide bond formation is one of the most important reactions in both chemistry and biology, but there is currently no chemical method of achieving α-peptide ligation in water that tolerates all of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids at the peptide ligation site. The universal genetic code establishes that the biological role of peptides predates life’s last universal common ancestor and that peptides played an essential part in the origins of life.They conclude with sheer speculation that blind nature learned how to control metabolic reactions:Controlled synthesis, which responds to environmental or internal stimuli, is an essential element of metabolic regulation, and we speculate that coupling iterative aminonitrile ligation to metabolic (redox) cycles may lead to positive cooperative feedback during the early evolution of life.As we have shown, however, the investigators used design to push reactions against natural tendencies. Nature is the opposite of “controlled synthesis.”Rescuing Something Useful for DesignersWhile this paper really does nothing to further evolution, it does have some significance for researchers who need to make short, synthetic peptides for use in their research. To date, the “enemy” is water; all synthesis reactions have to be carried out under anhydrous [dry] conditions. Additionally, the amino acids used must have various blocking groups added to functional groups to prevent their reaction. For example, lysine has two amino groups, but only one of them (the α-amino group) is involved in peptide bond formation in proteins. The other amino group (the ε-amino group) must be prevented from participating in bond formation. Thus, it must be blocked by another moiety that can be readily removed later.Proteins are specified sequences of amino acids that fold into molecular machines and catalysts. (Illustra Media, Origin).The scheme reported here can permit synthesis of peptides in the presence of water, and no added blocking groups are needed. Additionally, the reaction scheme reported here also preserves the chirality, or handedness, of the ligated amino acids. Finally, these reactions may be carried out at various temperature and pH values with good yields. Thus, this report may significantly change the way small peptides are synthesized in the lab.It would also be interesting to investigate whether the polymerization of nucleotides into nucleic acids, like DNA and RNA, can occur under the conditions reported here. As long as materialistic ideology is not pushing the conclusions beyond what the facts warrant, and as long as results are not made to imply that nature can synthesize the “building blocks of life” blindly, or claim that this is how life started without a Creator, then the paper has some useful ideas for scientists using intelligence to build molecules by design.ReferenceCanavelli et al., “Peptide ligation by chemoselective aminonitrile coupling in water,” Nature 10 July 2019. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1371-4last_img read more

A Look At The Oklahoma State-Kansas Drive Charts

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Yards per play: 6.6Points per drive (offense): 3.14Points per drive (defense): 1.43Points off turnovers: 17Average starting field position: Own 42You should be averaging over seven yards per play against KU. The PPD numbers are fine, but OSU’s offense was greatly aided turnovers that it got in great position (three times inside KU’s 30 in the second half).Kansas Drive Chartscreen-shot-2016-10-24-at-8-40-40-amKansas actually started off nicely with scores on three of its first five possessions. But then it was held to seven points on its next nine drives. That’s not going to get it done (obviously). A few other numbers …Yards per play: 6.2Points per drive (offense): 1.43Points per drive (defense): 3.14Points off turnovers: 7Average starting field position: Own 19That average starting field position is something else. Nobody is going to win many games starting on their own 19 on average, much less Kansas.Also a note on that yards-per-play number: OSU is now No. 118 in the country in plays allowed of 30+ yards. Texas Tech and OU are both top five in the country in plays of 30+ yards on offense. Gulp. Drive charts and points scored per drive might just bore you right to tears, but I find this stuff fascinating. It matters because you can look at drive charts and PPD and determine “could that team score when it needed to, and could it get stops when it needed to.”So let’s look at the two drive charts from Saturday’s game against Kansas and a few other deep statistics that mattered.OSU Drive Chartscreen-shot-2016-10-24-at-8-40-29-amThis started off pretty poorly. OSU went punt, fumble, TD and punt in its first four drives against one of the worst teams in FBS. The Pokes closed strong though with scores on five of their last six real drives. Other key numbers to know.last_img read more

Our Favorite Plays From Saturday’s Win Over Texas Tech

first_imgWe had some fun with this post last week as we looked at some of the most memorable plays from Saturday’s game. Oklahoma State posted the game highlights, but these were individual (and maybe more under the radar) moments that stood out to us.Blake Jarwin (again)This is becoming a weekly occurrence. Jarwin has at least one catch in nine of 10 games this season and exactly one in three of the last four. Almost all of them look exactly like this one.Lil Sho TDThis was just a disgusting pitch and catch. Remember when people were calling Rudolph “average” earlier this year. Yeah, LOL.McCleskey’s fumble I know this ended poorly, but man I really loved the formation and setup. Would love to see this more with No. 1.Justice For allHe’s just a complete freak. And that downfield block from Lacy was paramount.Dimes on dimes on dimesA big balls throw from No. 2 over the middle here. He loves that spot as well as the sideline comeback. It’s a joy to watch.Justin Phillips sackPhillips had 14 tackles including this takedown of Mahomes in the fourth quarter. He was awesome with Chad Whitener out.PeaceCould watch forever. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

On The Importance of 10 Wins For Oklahoma State

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. The elusive 10-win season. Oklahoma State has seven of them ever. Ever! Four of those have come in the last seven seasons with a chance on Thursday to make that five in seven as the Pokes try to move to 10-3 in 2016 in the Alamo Bowl against Colorado. A quick look at some of the winningest teams of the last few years reveals good company for Mike Gundy and Co.Here are all the teams with 5+ 10-win seasons in the last seven years (since 2010).Alabama: 7Ohio State: 6Clemson: 6Oklahoma: 6Florida State: 5 (6 if it beats Michigan)Stanford: 5Boise State: 5Wisconsin: 5Oregon: 5Michigan State: 5Northern Illinois: 5OSU is the only team during bowl season that has a chance to join this list. LSU isn’t on it. Neither is USC. Not TCU. Not Baylor. Not Louisville, Georgia or Nebraska.“It’s big,” said offensive lineman Zach Crabtree on Tuesday. “It’s always something. I remember coming in here and Coach Gundy talking about that from day one. Any time you can hit double-digit wins at this level, it’s huge. Not many people in the country win 10 games a year, and so this game has big-time implications on it for us. We want this 10th win. It means a lot. It’s just the middle level of success, just puts you in elite company, and we’re there, and we want to stay there.”“Just for me, being here five years and having a chance to have three 10-win seasons, that’s unbelievable,” added senior receiver Austin Hays. “There’s probably I think Coach Gundy told us the other day, there’s only eight or nine teams in the last four years that have won more games than we have, and to be a part of this has just been so special, and then for the guys coming back, to beat a top-10 team in Colorado and to make that our double-digit win would just be huge for the guys coming back, to create that momentum going forward and to propel them into having a great year next year.”Defensive coordinator Glenn Spencer stunningly downplayed the achievement before it has been completed.“I don’t like to reflect and I don’t like to kind of summarize things until it’s all said and done, because if we don’t do it, we’ll be sitting back and saying, why couldn’t we get 10,” said Spencer. “But without skirting your question, we’ve had a string of success around here, and I try to get these guys just to think about the next game, and maybe when their career is over, look back and kind of see the superlatives.“I guess we just love to do things right. We love to win the right way. I loved for these guys to leave our program knowing that they’ve gained a lot about life, about being a brother, about sacrifice, and then if you can win 10 games and win bowl games, that’s an awesome thing, too. So I don’t want to diminish that at all. But I just love the process to go through with these young men.”When you win it leads to more winning. Success breeds success as Spencer said. Because success is what the future loves.last_img read more

Watch: Mason Rudolph, Mike Gundy Talk Oklahoma State Spring Game

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Coach Mike Gundy and his quarterback Mason Rudolph chatted with the media after the Cowboys’ Spring Game. They spoke about what they saw and Rudolph’s Heisman Trophy candidacy.last_img read more

Can OSU Finally Find an X-Factor in the Return Game?

first_imgOn October 31, 2015, during a Halloween game in Lubbock, Jalen McCleskey fielded a high-bouncing punt, went right and proceeded to break the hearts of the tortilla faithful as he followed blockers into the end zone. The Cowboys would beat the Red Raiders 70-53. That was also the last time a Cowboy scored on a punt or kickoff return.Over Mike Gundy’s tenure, the presence of a dynamic kick returner had almost become the norm. There were guys like Dez Bryant, Perrish Cox and Josh Stewart. Justin Gilbert. Tyreek Hill.Each one of them had the ability to take the most redundant part of a football game and turn it into a dramatic momentum shift, in no time at all. Unfortunately for Gundy, the Cowboys have hit a bit of a dry spell in highlight-worthy return plays over the past couple of years.In 2015, a good chunk of kick return reps fell to a pair of true freshmen in running back Jeff Carr and wide receiver Jalen McCleskey. At times, their inexperience showed. Neither really struck fear into the hearts of opposing coaches.In 2016, it looked like prodigal son Barry J. Sanders might reignite the return game. After that exhilarating 57-yard punt return in the season opener against SE Louisiana — that probably should have been a TD — Sanders didn’t gain more than 12 yards in any single punt return the rest of the year. Neither did McCleskey, who split punts with the former Stanford tailback.It’s not just that the Cowboys couldn’t score on a single return last season. They were never able to find “that guy,” even with the multitude of playmakers at different skill positions on the roster.During practice this week, our own Hayden Barber asked Gundy if he has anyone in mind to resurrect that crucial role.“McCleskey catches, Carr catches, Tyron Johnson will catch,” said Gundy. “And then we have to get a freshman. One of those guys. We have enough skill coming in between the running backs, receivers and corners that one of those freshmen needs to emerge back there, whoever we end up playing, we need to have one of those guys back there returning.”McCleskey and Carr are both experienced in the role, no doubt. We know both are bigger and stronger now. We know both can make plays. Maybe just more experience is the key.Then there’s the apparent 2017 Big 12 Newcomer of the Year, Tyron Johnson. Maybe he is the x-factor the Cowboys have been waiting for. There’s also a couple of redshirt freshmen backs in speedster La’Darren Brown and Ja’Ron Wilson who may get a shot by this fall. Or it could be Chuba Hubbard, who hasn’t even showed up for school yet.It could be someone we’re not even talking about.But if you’re in attendance for the Spring Game, you’ll get just a small glimpse at the kick returners. There will be no punt returns and scores will be followed by a spot on the 25-yard line but each half will have an opening kickoff.So fight the urge to check your phone during those kickoffs. You might miss that juke or wiggle that starts a renaissance in the return game. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Mkhitaryan, Wilshere start against Ostersunds

first_imgArsenal v Östersunds FK Arsenal team news: Mkhitaryan, Wilshere start against Ostersunds Seth Vertelney Last updated 1 year ago 03:00 23/2/2018 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Henrikh Mkhitaryan Getty Images Arsenal v Östersunds FK UEFA Europa League Östersunds FK Arsenal With progression nearly assured, Arsene Wenger has named a team made up of both regular starters and reserves Arsene Wenger has named a side mixed with starters and reserves against Ostersunds in the Europa League round-of-32 second leg at Emirates Stadium on Thursday. Jack Wilshere and Henrikh Mkhitaryan are among the Gunners regulars who will get a start against the Swedish side. The Gunners won the first leg 3-0 in Sweden last week, and will be heavy favourites to advance to the round of 16.  Article continues below Editors’ Picks Williams case shows Solskjaer isn’t holding Man Utd’s youngsters back – he’s protecting them Goalkeeper crisis! Walker to the rescue but City sweating on Ederson injury ahead of Liverpool clash Out of his depth! Emery on borrowed time after another abysmal Arsenal display Diving, tactical fouls & the emerging war of words between Guardiola & Klopp Several of Arsenal’s biggest stars have been rested with one eye on Sunday’s Carabao Cup final against Manchester City, including Mesut Ozil, who has battled illness this week.Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang is cup-tied, while Alexandre Lacazette is out with a knee injury. Aaron Ramsey has resumed training but isn’t fit enough to feature yet. Arsenal XI: Ospina; Bellerin, Chambers, Holding, Kolasinac; Maitland-Niles, Elneny, Wilshere, Mkhitaryan; Iwobi, WelbeckSubs: Macey, Mustafi, Monreal, Xhaka, Willock, Nelson, Nketiahlast_img read more

Ranking the Top 5 OSU Helmet Matchups

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. I can say with a decent amount of certainty — and a certain amount of homerism  notwithstanding — that Oklahoma State’s equipment staff is the best in the biz when it comes to innovation and style.So in preparation for the next four months of my life, when I’ll be keenly locked into what college students wear on Saturdays (football’s next week!!!), I thought it would be a good time to look back over some of the best helmet matchups OSU has been apart of in recent years.There have been some great ones.To help narrow things down, I’m going 2016-on, when the Pokes started wearing their current uniform set.No. 5 — 2018 Oklahoma State vs. Missouri (Liberty Bowl)46564117541_f080e91802_kOn OSU’s side, you’ve got one of my favorite non-throwback helmets the Cowboys wear. The black is sick and the chrome orange brand just pops. It’s a masterful spin on a classic.It has to be simple and clean, but I’m all-in on quirky throwback mascots and logos. Give me OSU’s bucking bronco, Baylor’s retro Bear in cap and I even liked WVU’s state map thing they brought to Stillwater last year.I’m a sucker for them as long as they are done right. And Mizzou got the Tiger right IMO.46512223812_2dadb5dd33_k.jpgNo. 4 — 2017 or 2018 BedlamThis matchup elicits mixed emotions.Its obvious, stunningly-simple style and color contrast makes me visibly mouth the words “college football, baby,” though it conjures memories of late-game gut wrenches.But let’s talk helmets.37481341744_72f4f2d604_kThe thing that makes most of the matchups on this list stick in my memory is their stark contrasting colors.26414452009_6a363475ff_kI’ve already mentioned my affection for the orange brand on black and then you juxtapose that with OU’s crimson cap that — sickening or not — is one of the more classic looks in college football. Both helmets are shining achievements in simple done right.The last two meetings have featured this same helmet pairing, and I desperately hope the final scores don’t dissuade OSU from making this a Bedlam tradition moving forward.No. 3 — 2018 Texas at Oklahoma State (Homecoming)44869356554_bcb5c66310_kOkay, I know what I just said about contrasting colors, but when a school executes its best overall throwback uniform look (probably ever) with Barry Sanders — the 🐐 that made it sentimental on-hand — and it features maybe the best throwback helmet ever, I have to include it.45543703382_2efddbb5e5_kAnd let’s not skip over the classic, clean look of the Longhorns’ lids. In this instance the white-on-white with differing shades of orange makes for a harmonious pairing, even if the game didn’t end that way.No. 2 — 2017 Baylor at Oklahoma State (Homecoming)37682558252_8e0071f8e2_kThe Bears don’t always stick the landing with their helmet-uni combos, but when they do the results are pretty great. One of my favorite helmet pairings includes this semi-gloss green lid from Baylor with gold BU logo.Now, let’s take a minute to appreciate the pure beauty of this brain bucket.37682327412_d5f741a858_kAn aside: As for the game itself, it was over at halftime. I remember that because it was so unseasonably warm for mid-October that, I have no shame in admitting, my wife and I exited BPS early in the third quarter and Ubered back to a friend’s house in Stillwater in search of air conditioning, beer (this was the olden days) and in order to get a head-start on the waiting saga that is trying to get Hideaway delivered on Homecoming Saturday (it still took hours). My only regret is not stealing another glimpse of those lovely lids.No. 1 — 2016 West Virginia at Oklahoma State (Homecoming)USATSI_9639896_154512258_lowres[USATSI]This meeting of the mattes is my single favorite matchup in recent history, probably ever. The flat black OSU helmet with white retro band is dripping with cool, and the Mountaineers’ own retro stenciled offering is not far behind. (Again, I’m a sucker for simple and clean.)USATSI_9639350_154512258_lowres[USATSI]This great two-team look was completed with a nice tri-color uniform combination from both schools, but the only thing equal to the Jimmy Johnson-era helmets were those black/orange-striped socks pictured above.I can’t wait to see what they’re going to come up with next.last_img read more