Police colonel attacks three reporters in Goma

first_img RSF_en Journalist arrested on provincial governor’s orders Democratic Republic of CongoAfrica Condemning abuses Violence Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is shocked to learn that a senior Congolese police officer, Col. Van Kasongo, and other policemen physically attacked three journalists while they were covering a peaceful demonstration in Goma, the capital of the eastern province of Nord-Kivu, on 12 April. News Lucha members demonstrating in Goma, eastern DRC, 12/04/2017 © Compte Facebook de la Lucha April 14, 2017 Police colonel attacks three reporters in Goma News to go further Help by sharing this information Organisation Newscenter_img February 24, 2021 Find out more February 18, 2021 Find out more Democratic Republic of CongoAfrica Condemning abuses Violence Reporter jailed in DRC for allegedly defaming parliamentarian Follow the news on Democratic Republic of Congo Congolese reporter wounded by gunshot while covering protest in Goma News Receive email alerts Rozen Kalafulo of Pole FM, Freddy Bikumbi of Radio Okapi and Picture Tank photographer Willian Dupuy were attacked and beaten by the police after being told to move away from the demonstration by members of the grass-roots movement Struggle for Change (LUCHA). The police also seized their equipment. “I was doing my report when Col. Van Kasongo grabbed me by the hair,” Kalafulo said. “He throttled me in front of everyone, punched me in the chest and head, and then confiscated my equipment.” The equipment was returned to the journalists thanks to the intervention of Tuver Ghundi, a representative of Journalist in Danger (JED), who called Gen. Vital Umiya Awashango, the provincial police commander. Gen. Awashango, who is Col. Kasongo’s immediate superior, has asked to meet with the journalists. “We firmly condemn this attack by Col. Kasongo, who has a history of violence against journalists, and we call for him to be brought to justice before the relevant military tribunal,” RSF editor-in-chief Virginie Dangles said. Col. Kasongo, who is deputy commander of the Nord-Kivu police, is notorious for his attacks on journalists. In July 2016, he made a very explicit death threat against Radio Okapi journalist Gabriel Wamenya. The Democratic Republic of Congo is ranked 152nd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2016 World Press Freedom Index. February 16, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Gardai investigate assault on man

first_imgFacebook GARDAI are investigating an attack on a man in the city centre some time after 2am yesterday morning in Upper William Street.It is understood the victim, who is believed to be in his early twenties, was assaulted by a group of men and received a laceration to the face.He was taken to the Mid Western Regional Hospital, but was released a short time later. Print Advertisement WhatsApp Twittercenter_img Linkedin NewsLocal NewsGardai investigate assault on manBy admin – May 5, 2009 476 Email Previous articleMan dies in road accidentNext articleCollins family to march in honour of Roy’s death adminlast_img

Hugo Alfredo Santillan, 23, becomes second boxer in days to die from injuries in ring

first_imgRIP Hugo Santillan.He passed away from injuries suffered during Saturday’s fight which ended in a draw.We join Hugo’s family and friends in grief, support and wish prompt resignation.Via @marcosarienti pic.twitter.com/WwT7LyLXIW— World Boxing Council (@WBCBoxing) July 25, 2019A super lightweight, Santillan — the son of former boxer Alfredo Santillan — made his pro debut in 2015 and was 19-6-2 with eight KOs. He becomes the second boxer this week to die from injuries sustained in the ring.Join DAZN to watch Hooker vs. Ramirez on July 27 and 100+ fight nights a year​Maxim Dadashev of Russia died Tuesday after suffering a similar brain injury during a fight Friday in Maryland against Subriel Matias of Puerto Rico. Dadashev was 28.According to ringside reports from Buenos Aires (via ESPN.com), Santillan’s nose began to bleed in the fourth round of Saturday’s 10-round bout and, though he raised his arm in victory after the fight, he collapsed after the judges announced the fight as a draw.Santillan, nicknamed “Dynamite,” underwent surgery for a clot on his brain and twice went into cardiorespiratory failure before he died of cardiac arrest at 12:35 a.m. Thursday local time Thursday, Olocco confirmed.“Upon admission to the hospital, he had successive kidney failure and he did not come out of his coma,” Olocco said (via The Guardian). “He had swelling of his brain and he never recovered consciousness. The swelling continued to worsen, and it affected the functioning of the rest of his organs.”The WBC expressed its condolences, tweeting, in part, “We join Hugo’s family and friends in grief.” Argentine boxer Hugo Alfredo Santillan died Thursday in Buenos Aires of injuries suffered in his fight Saturday against Eduardo Javier Abreu, Dr. Graciela Olocco from Hospital Agudos San Felipe confirmed to local media.Santillan was 23.last_img read more

JoePa’s grand experiment produced perfection

first_imgREMEMBERING JOE—Penn State football trading cards, candles and flowers placed by fans are displayed near a statue of former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno outside Beaver Stadium on the Penn State University campus on Jan. 22, in State College, Pa. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) by Ralph D. Russo(AP)—In the mid-1960s, there was no such thing as a Northeastern power in college football.Michigan State and Notre Dame dominated the Midwest. Bear Bryant’s Alabama teams ruled the South. Out West, UCLA was at its best and USC was rising again.Then came Joe Paterno. “Here was this little old school from the East that didn’t know how to compete with the bigger conferences,” said Charlie Pittman, who played running back at Penn State from 1967-69.That’s what others said about Penn State. The Nittany Lions knew better.With players such as Pittman, Franco Harris, Lydell Mitchell, Jack Ham and Mike Reid, Paterno changed that in 1968 and ‘69, with back-to-back undefeated seasons.Neither earned the Nittany Lions a national championship. They had to settle for No. 2 in the AP’s college football poll each year, but Penn State was now a national powerhouse and Paterno was a coaching star.His career started modestly in 1966, going 5-5 in his first season as the replacement for his mentor, Rip Engle. The East hadn’t had a national title winner since Syracuse in 1959 and was looked upon as a weak region in the college football landscape.Paterno’s first team lost 42-8 to No. 1 Michigan State and 49-11 to No. 4 UCLA, and the ‘67 season started with a loss to Navy.Instead of being loyal to the upperclassmen, “He decided to play the best guys,” Pittman said.The Nittany Lions beat the Hurricanes 17-8 in Miami, lost 17-15 to No. 4 UCLA and Heisman Trophy winner Gary Beban the next week, and finished the season 8-2-1.Paterno had a keen eye for talent and was skilled at finding the best ways to use it.“He took quarterbacks and made them linebackers. He took running backs and made them defensive backs,” said Pittman, who played two years in the NFL and now is the vice president of publishing company based in South Bend, Ind.And long before every football coach talked about the “process” of preparing a team, Paterno pored over the smallest details and implored his players to do the same.“Take care of the small stuff and the big things will take care of themselves,” was one of Paterno’s messages, Pittman said. That meant on the practice field and in the classroom.“Penn State won because he wanted to recruit people with the same values he had,” Pittman said. “People who wanted to compete at the highest level and people who wanted to participate and truly enjoy college, not just to play football.”Paterno called it his “Grand Experiment.”“I always tell people we came to Penn State as young kids and when we left there we were men and the reason for that was Joe Paterno,” Mitchell said.Paterno and Penn State finally won the national championship in 1982 and he added another in 1986. The “Grand Experiment” unveiled in 1967 had produced an elite college football program.last_img read more

Schools Take Action In Wake Of New Vaping Findings

first_imgBy Chris Rotolo |A recent study on electronic cigarettes and vaping devices indicates that users of these products are exposing themselves to cancer-causing toxins, and the report is eliciting action from local schools.According to the study’s lead researcher, Mark Rubinstein, M.D., a professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, urine tests from the bodies of teens who used electronic cigarettes and vaping devices revealed elevated levels of five different toxins that are referred to as Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), all of which are known or suspected carcinogens.Adrian Pristas, M.D., a pulmonologist for Hackensack Meridian Health at Riverview Medical Center, said these VOCs can only become carcinogenic when they are heated to a certain temperature and though vape devices are not believed to produce that level of heat, the fact that they are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has led him to raise questions.“Why would you take the chance? This is a situation that is not much different than what we’re facing with (marijuana), in that the use is way ahead of the medical knowledge,” Pristas said.“The fact is we don’t know a whole lot about what vaping is doing to the human body. We can only compare it to other inhalation exposures. Vaping is potentially dangerous.”Rubinstein’s study indicated that traces of these potentially harmful VOCs were detected at a rate up to three times higher in users than in those teens who did not vape.“Many of these compounds are carcinogenic. Will they definitely cause cancer? We don’t know that, but it’s ordinarily not a good idea to put these compounds in your body, especially if you’re a youngster who is going to use these devices for many years and live with the impact of DNA mutation over that time,” said Norman Edelman, M.D., senior scientific advisor for the American Lung Association.Though touted as a healthier option to traditional combustible cigarettes, the recent study on these VOCs tells a more threatening tale, especially when considering that addictive properties like nicotine are still present inside the liquid used within an electronic cigarette.“It’s been proven that these devices do produce nicotine. These things are not free and clear like they’ve been made out to be,” Pristas said. “And they appear to be an addictive gateway device that leads to cigarette use, as studies have shown that those who are 14 to 30 years of age and vape are four times more likely to start smoking.”One of Pristas’ biggest concerns surrounding the vaping issue is the latest marketing trend that appears to be targeting younger users with various flavors, including Bananas Foster, Rainbow Candy, Berry Splash and many more. These tactics are also troubling to Oceanport resident Kim Murphy, who helped found the borough’s Drug Education Initiative committee (DEI).“All of these flavors, all these marketing tactics, they’re absolutely trying to draw in younger users, and as a parent it’s very upsetting,” Murphy said. “I’ve read that they’re primarily targeting young girls, because the vapors smell like their perfume, so they can get away with it easier. But the fact is the marketing is working. Young kids are very into it. These companies are making a lot of money. And it’s our job to educate our families.”Murphy and the DEI committee are taking an initial educational step by inviting local parents to “Vaping: What Every Parent Should Know,” a presentation on March 20 at the Maple Place School, which will display information on the dangers of vaping, trends concerning kids, the cosmetic makeup of vaping devices and the flavored liquids that are available.According to Murphy, the presentation is a response to the lack of easily digestible and readily available information on the issue, and the recent increase in questions she and the DEI committee have received from concerned parents.“It’s been the No. 1 question people have had and it’s a topic that we personally don’t know much about,” Murphy said. “We don’t know what our kids were facing. We don’t know why it’s so easy for them to do it. It’s obvious that times are changing. Kids really aren’t smoking cigarettes anymore. But this is a new threat. And we need to create different platforms for professionals to come and educate us on what we’re dealing with.”The presentation will be made at 7 p.m. and led by PJ O’Connell, Shore Regional High School’s security director, who hosted the same session at his high school in January.“We’re very excited to have PJ leading the presentation, because he’s a retired police detective who worked in Ocean Township, so he’s able to speak from experience. He’ll show what it is that your kids are doing. He’ll let you smell the different scents. He’ll show what the different devices look like so you can identify them at home. Vaping is very accessible to our kids, but PJ is here to help.” Murphy said.Earlier this month a presentation was held at Middletown High School South for district parents to attend and acquire information about vaping, and several other Two River-area townships are addressing, or have addressed the issue.When the calendar turned to 2018, Red Bank Regional Superintendent Louis Moore issued a policy update to his school community, reminding students that in 2010, the state of New Jersey had implemented a vaping ban prohibiting the use of electronic cigarettes and vaping devices in all indoor public places, businesses and schools. Moore’s update also stated that possession and use of these devices on school property or at school functions “may result in serious consequences for students, including suspension, police referral and a mandatory substance screening.”On April 25, all Freehold Regional School District parents are invited to Colts Neck High School for a special presentation titled “Vaping: The Smoke Screen our Parents Need to Know About Vapes, E-Cigs & Cloud Pens.” The 45-minute event will be led by Douglas S. Collier of Drug Education Awareness, and will include a Q&A session for attendees.This article was first published in the March 15-22, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Peewee Leafs double Rossland/Trail 4-2 to clinch West Kootenay semi final series, now meet Castlegar Sunday in Sunflower City

first_imgBackstopped by the rock-solid goaltending by Curt Doyle, Nelson took a 1-0 lead on a second-period goal by Enns.Jayden Bennett increased the margin to 2-0 before the team exchanged goals.Enns then score into the empty net to complete the comeback.Ben Woodward also scored for Nelson.The Reps now advance to play Castlegar in the West Kootenay Minor Hockey Peewee Rep Finals beginning Sunday in the Sunflower City.Castlegar won the regular season league title by a point over Nelson. The teams split three regular season games but Nelson defeated their West Kootenay rivals twice in tournament play.Game two of the series is tentatively set for Tuesday in Nelson.The West Kootenay winner represents the zone at the B.C. Minor Hockey Tier III Peewee Rep Championships March 18-23 in [email protected] The Nelson Peewee Reps took the long road to the West Kootenay Minor Hockey League Peewee Rep Final.After rallying from a one game deficit, the Reps completed the comeback against Rossland/Trail, doubling the visitors 4-2 Thursday at the Civic Centre in Nelson.Avery Enns scored twice to lead the Reps to the victory.”Once again we had a slow start in the first period,” said Nelson coach Brian Jones. “I don’t think it was nerves. All season we just seem to do it the hard way.”Nelson, winners of game two of the series 6-2 in Trail Monday, wins the first-team-to-four-point series 4-2.Rossland/Trail won the opening game of the playoff series Friday in Nelson 1-0. Brett Watson was outstanding in shutting out the Nelson Reps.However, Thursday Nelson continued to build from Monday’s performance.last_img read more