Editorial on pollution notification missed mark

first_imgTransparency is vital in public works and we therefore provided notification of our findings well in advance of the deadline set forth by the NYSDOH.We received the final notification and instructions from the Department of Health on January 3, 2018, and issued our statement to the public on January 8, 2018.  The state had given the CPWA until January 20th to provide notification, but we felt it was important to address the issue as soon as we had conclusive findings to report.  The editorial’s suggestion that the public could have been alerted earlier would have not only elicited a disproportionate magnitude of worry within the community but is also just inaccurate.  Each step of the process was done in a timely fashion and in compliance with federal, state and local regulations.  Helmut GerstenbergerClifton ParkThe writer is CPWA board chairmanMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationControversial solar project goes before Clifton Park Planning BoardEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes On behalf of the CPWA, I would like to address the inaccuracies listed in the editorial published by the Gazette in its Wednesday, January 24, 2018 issue.  The editorial indicated that we knowingly withheld public health information from the community we live in and serve, an accusation that could cause unwarranted harm to our customer’s confidence in the safety of the public water supply.The CPWA does frequent sampling to ensure it is providing safe, quality water.  To remain in legal compliance and uphold our responsibility to the community, we routinely sample and test the water supply to ensure quality and compliance with all state and federal regulations, including all those established under the Safe Drinking Water Act.  All sample results are forwarded by the testing laboratory to the NYS Department of Health, where the data is examined and compliance is determined. The CPWA received results on December 11, 2017, for testing done in November, indicating that the samples from the northernmost part of its service area contained a higher level of a byproduct of the disinfection process, substances known as Haloacetic Acids (HAA), than is permitted by federal regulation.  The Saratoga County Water Authority, from whom we purchase water supplies for the affected region, immediately resampled for further testing.  The results issued on December 29, 2017, indicated that HAA levels had dropped to well below the regulatory limit.  Thanks to these follow-up efforts, the CPWA and the Department of Health were able to determine that the water had already returned to normal, satisfactory levels and did not pose a health concern.   Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Monday July 22nd Local Sports

first_imgTODAY ON AM-1300 KGLO, kgloam.com & kglonews.com:== 5:15 pre-game, 5:30 first pitch — Class 2A state softball — Central Springs vs. Alta-Aurelia== 7:00 — Class 4A substate semifinal baseball — Mason City vs. Ankeny== After baseball — Twins-Yankees joined in progress == 3A quarterfinals tonight7:00 — #1 Davenport Assumption (38-2) vs. Algona (17-10)7:30 — #5 Albia (27-4) vs. #6 Columbus of Waterloo (35-4) == other 2A quarterfinals today3:00 — #1 North Linn (39-4) vs. Wapello (17-12)3:30 — #9 Mount Ayr (25-2) vs. #10 Beckman of Dyersville (29-13)5:00 — #5 East Marshall (31-4) vs. #14 Ogden (25-7) FORT DODGE — 8th-ranked Central Springs plays in their fifth consecutive state softball tournament late this afternoon when they face 13th-ranked Alta-Aurelia in a Class 2A quarterfinal at the Harlan & Hazel Rogers Sports Complex in Fort Dodge. The Panthers are 28-7 overall and have one of the best power-hitting teams in the state tournament, leading all of Class 2A and being fourth overall in the state in home runs hit, being fourth overall and second in Class 2A in slugging percentage, and being sixth in Class 2A in batting average. Alta-Aurelia is 20-9 as they make their second straight trip to the state tournament, being led by two of their three seniors. Abby Kraemer leads the team with a .467 batting average and has a 19-9 record in the circle. Jessica Flaherty hits .441 and has three homers and 30 runs batted in. You can hear the Central Springs/Alta-Aurelia game on AM-1300 KGLO and kgloam.com starting with the pre-game at about 5:15 this evening, with the first pitch scheduled for 5:30. MASON CITY — In Class 4A tonight, Mason City will host Ankeny in a substate semifinal contest at Roosevelt Field. The Mohawks are 25-14 after beating Des Moines Lincoln 3-0 in the substate quarterfinal round at home on Friday night. Ankeny edged Fort Dodge 6-5 in their substate first round game. You can hear the Mason City-Ankeny game on AM-1300 KGLO and kgloam.com starting at 7:00 PM. The winner of tonight’s game will face the substate’s top seed Des Moines Roosevelt on Wednesday in a game to be played at Southeast Polk. NEW HAMPTON — In Class 2A District 3, New Hampton beat Osage 7-2 in the district championship game. Osage finishes their season with a record of 18-7. New Hampton will face Oelwein in the substate championship game Tuesday night in Waverly. == Class 1A quarterfinals today11:00 — #1 Collins-Maxwell (25-1) vs. Gehlen of LeMars (21-9)11:30 — #4 Newell-Fonda (37-5) vs. #7 Lynnville-Sully (26-8)1:00 — #2 Lisbon (32-6) vs. Wayne (23-8)1:30 — #3 Clarksville (31-1) vs. #9 Bishop Garrigan of Algona (29-6) MASON CITY — Newman used eight runs in the first inning on their way to an 11-2 win over West Fork in the Class 1A District 4 championship game on Saturday, as you heard on AM-1300 KGLO. Josh Fitzgerald had a two-run homer and finished the game 2-for-4 with two runs scored. Evan Paulus pitched the first 5 2/3 innings, striking out 11 and walking two. Newman is now 34-3 on the season and will face Newell-Fonda in tomorrow night’s substate championship game in Algona. Newell-Fonda won the District 3 title game with a 6-4 victory over Sioux Central. MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Max Kepler drove in four runs, including the game-winner to cap a two-run rally in the ninth inning, and the Minnesota Twins beat the Oakland Athletics 7-6 on Sunday. Ehire Adrianza’s third hit of the game was a triple off Liam Hendriks (2-1) that scored Luis Arraez from first base with one out in the ninth. LAS VEGAS (AP) — Liz Cambage had 22 points, 13 rebounds, Kayla McBride scored 20 points, and the Las Vegas Aces beat the Minnesota Lynx 79-74. Kelsey Plum added 10 points and eight assists for the Aces (12-6), who have won six of their last seven games. ST. ANSGAR — St. Ansgar and North Butler had their Class 1A District 5 championship game Saturday morning suspended after an inning and a half due to thunderstorms with the Bearcats leading 1-0. The game will be resumed tonight at 7 o’clock in St. Ansgar. The winner will have to quickly turn around and face South Winneshiek in the substate championship game to be played in Decorah on Tuesday night.last_img read more

JoePa’s grand experiment produced perfection

first_imgREMEMBERING JOE—Penn State football trading cards, candles and flowers placed by fans are displayed near a statue of former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno outside Beaver Stadium on the Penn State University campus on Jan. 22, in State College, Pa. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) by Ralph D. Russo(AP)—In the mid-1960s, there was no such thing as a Northeastern power in college football.Michigan State and Notre Dame dominated the Midwest. Bear Bryant’s Alabama teams ruled the South. Out West, UCLA was at its best and USC was rising again.Then came Joe Paterno. “Here was this little old school from the East that didn’t know how to compete with the bigger conferences,” said Charlie Pittman, who played running back at Penn State from 1967-69.That’s what others said about Penn State. The Nittany Lions knew better.With players such as Pittman, Franco Harris, Lydell Mitchell, Jack Ham and Mike Reid, Paterno changed that in 1968 and ‘69, with back-to-back undefeated seasons.Neither earned the Nittany Lions a national championship. They had to settle for No. 2 in the AP’s college football poll each year, but Penn State was now a national powerhouse and Paterno was a coaching star.His career started modestly in 1966, going 5-5 in his first season as the replacement for his mentor, Rip Engle. The East hadn’t had a national title winner since Syracuse in 1959 and was looked upon as a weak region in the college football landscape.Paterno’s first team lost 42-8 to No. 1 Michigan State and 49-11 to No. 4 UCLA, and the ‘67 season started with a loss to Navy.Instead of being loyal to the upperclassmen, “He decided to play the best guys,” Pittman said.The Nittany Lions beat the Hurricanes 17-8 in Miami, lost 17-15 to No. 4 UCLA and Heisman Trophy winner Gary Beban the next week, and finished the season 8-2-1.Paterno had a keen eye for talent and was skilled at finding the best ways to use it.“He took quarterbacks and made them linebackers. He took running backs and made them defensive backs,” said Pittman, who played two years in the NFL and now is the vice president of publishing company based in South Bend, Ind.And long before every football coach talked about the “process” of preparing a team, Paterno pored over the smallest details and implored his players to do the same.“Take care of the small stuff and the big things will take care of themselves,” was one of Paterno’s messages, Pittman said. That meant on the practice field and in the classroom.“Penn State won because he wanted to recruit people with the same values he had,” Pittman said. “People who wanted to compete at the highest level and people who wanted to participate and truly enjoy college, not just to play football.”Paterno called it his “Grand Experiment.”“I always tell people we came to Penn State as young kids and when we left there we were men and the reason for that was Joe Paterno,” Mitchell said.Paterno and Penn State finally won the national championship in 1982 and he added another in 1986. The “Grand Experiment” unveiled in 1967 had produced an elite college football program.last_img read more