Editorial on pollution notification missed mark

first_imgTransparency is vital in public works and we therefore provided notification of our findings well in advance of the deadline set forth by the NYSDOH.We received the final notification and instructions from the Department of Health on January 3, 2018, and issued our statement to the public on January 8, 2018.  The state had given the CPWA until January 20th to provide notification, but we felt it was important to address the issue as soon as we had conclusive findings to report.  The editorial’s suggestion that the public could have been alerted earlier would have not only elicited a disproportionate magnitude of worry within the community but is also just inaccurate.  Each step of the process was done in a timely fashion and in compliance with federal, state and local regulations.  Helmut GerstenbergerClifton ParkThe writer is CPWA board chairmanMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationControversial solar project goes before Clifton Park Planning BoardEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes On behalf of the CPWA, I would like to address the inaccuracies listed in the editorial published by the Gazette in its Wednesday, January 24, 2018 issue.  The editorial indicated that we knowingly withheld public health information from the community we live in and serve, an accusation that could cause unwarranted harm to our customer’s confidence in the safety of the public water supply.The CPWA does frequent sampling to ensure it is providing safe, quality water.  To remain in legal compliance and uphold our responsibility to the community, we routinely sample and test the water supply to ensure quality and compliance with all state and federal regulations, including all those established under the Safe Drinking Water Act.  All sample results are forwarded by the testing laboratory to the NYS Department of Health, where the data is examined and compliance is determined. The CPWA received results on December 11, 2017, for testing done in November, indicating that the samples from the northernmost part of its service area contained a higher level of a byproduct of the disinfection process, substances known as Haloacetic Acids (HAA), than is permitted by federal regulation.  The Saratoga County Water Authority, from whom we purchase water supplies for the affected region, immediately resampled for further testing.  The results issued on December 29, 2017, indicated that HAA levels had dropped to well below the regulatory limit.  Thanks to these follow-up efforts, the CPWA and the Department of Health were able to determine that the water had already returned to normal, satisfactory levels and did not pose a health concern.   Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img

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