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Govt will double outreach by spreading message on optimum nutrition during Poshan

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first_imgNew Delhi: The government will double its outreach during 'Poshan Maah' next month by taking the message of importance of optimum nutrition to every household, Women and Child Development Minister Smriti Irani said on Friday. 'Poshan Maah' or nutrition month, launched by the government last year, is celebrated across the country in September. Speaking at a ceremony to facilitate anganwadi workers for their contribution, Irani said there are five aspects of nutrition - first 1,000 days in the life of a child, fight against anaemia and diarrhea, personal hygiene and knowledge of what is nutritious. Also Read - India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details "The government will double its outreach during Poshan month by taking the message of importance of these five aspects of nutrition to every household," she said. Irani facilitated more than 300 awardees that included, states, districts, blocks, anganwadi workers and helpers and distributed Rs 22 crore among them. Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Andhra Pradesh were among the states to be facilitated at the ceremony. On the occasion of Janmashtami, Irani drew an analogy between Yashoda and anganwadi workers, and Kans and "evil" of malnutrition. She said she hopes anganwadi workers would beat malnutrition in the same way Yashoda defeated Kans. Also Read - Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday Irani said it is a common misconception that malnutrition is a problem of both rural and poor population. "Malnutrition is prevalent not only in rural and poor areas but also in urban areas of India and there is a need to spread awareness on what is healthy and nutritious food," she said. Prime Minister Narendra Modi's message was also read at the occasion where he said the government firmly remains committed to provide affordable and quality healthcare to poor, needy and smallest sections of the society. "Health and nutrition are the priority areas of our government. Health remains one of the key areas in our quest of building an inclusive and new India. An integral part of our vision is achieving 'kuposhan mukt bharat' (malnutrition-free India) by 2022," the message read. "Digital technology, convergence and targeted approach are to be optimally utilised to reduce malnutrition. This one-of-a-kind initiative is an endeavour to fight malnutrition through multiple interventions. We remain firmly committed to provide affordable and quality healthcare to poor, needy and smallest sections of the society," it said. The emphasis on health and nutrition will surely make a lasting contribution in furthering healthcare to every nook and corner of the country. However, such schemes can succeed only through a lasting community participation, the message read. The initiative to present incentive awards for Poshan is an acknowledgement and appreciation of the efforts of workforce at grassroots level such as anganwadi workers and helpers, auxillary workers and nurses, among others, it added.last_img
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Necessary Force For the last two years Nunaviks police force has been

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first_imgKnown in Quebec by their French acronym BEI, Quebec’s independent investigation bureau is mandated to investigate cases where a person is grievously injured or killed by police. Formed in July 2016, the BEI has investigated the KRPF 10 times. Many of the cases involve shootings, but not all.One case from April 2017 involved a young Inuk man dying in KRPF custody in Puvirnituq’s jail, despite the fact that in 2016, Quebec’s ombudsmen released a scathing report describing overcrowded conditions in jails in Nunavik as third world and unsanitary. They called for a complete overhaul for how people in Nunavik are detained a year before the Inuk man died in the Puvirnituq jail.Another open BEI investigation includes that of Mina Aculiak, who sustained several broken ribs, six fractured vertebrae, a broken left arm, a punctured lung, as well as a lacerated kidney and liver after being hit by a pursuing KRPF patrol car in Umiujaq, QC.“When I heard that she got struck by a police truck, it came to my mind, ‘why?’” Aculiak’s partner Paul Tookalook told APTN News in June.The petit Aculiak said she was running from police after shoplifting knives.“Why not run after her, pepper spray her? Not hit her,” asked Tookalook.The seriousness of most of Aculiak’s injuries were not immediately reported to the BEI by the KRPF, even though they are obligated to do so.  KRPF maintains that when Aculiak was medivacked to a hospital, it was thought that she only had a broken arm, and that the BEI was notified more than once about her more serious injuries.“When we noticed that the injury, a few weeks, I think a month later, it was more injured, we called back and told them that,” explained KRPF chief Jean Larose.Yet it wasn’t until Aculiak’s case received media attention two months after the incident that the BEI started investigating. When asked why the KRPF has so many violent encounters with Inuit, Larose states the KRPF is doing its best under difficult circumstances.“Right now, our police force, my men, is really out of breath and we are kind of on the respirator,” Larose said, exasperation showing through his normally calm demeanor.In 2017 Nunavik saw more than 11,000 criminal offences, 4,000 more than a decade earlier. For a population of 13,000, that’s almost one incident per person. Larose says when compared to the Montreal suburb he used to police, those rates are nearly 20 times higher.While Inuit in Nunavik still maintain strong ties to their land, language, and culture, they are also recovering from decades of colonial practices that include, but are not limited to, residential schools, forced relocations, and a sled dog slaughter by RCMP. The 11,000 criminal offences from 2017 include over 3,000 assaults and nearly 450 sexual assaults. Statistics show the majority of these crimes are alcohol related. Factor in that a rifle is rarely far from reach, and dangerous situations will arise.In June Larose was called to testify as an expert for the National Missing and Murdered Indigenous women and girls inquiry. There he described the KRPF as overworked, understaffed, and under-equipped to deal with the realities of policing Nunavik.“I was very shocked by the amount of work and the amount of incidents I’ve seen on my first five months on the job,” he testified, despite the fact colleagues had warned him that the job was going to be challenging.Larose also testified that in order for the KRPF to adequately police Nunavik, they need 30 more officers. Despite rising crime and population rates, they haven’t had a staff increase in 15 years. He also says a call centre, more specialized training, and equipment is a must.“It’s kind of basic things that we are asking, and I think that they understand, but the bottom line is, the money has to come,” stated Larose.The KRPF’s 2017 budget was $20 million, but this year they find themselves in limbo. While Quebec has increased its funds for KRPF, the federal government has yet to sign off on a new agreement.Larose says the five-year offer on the table isn’t much more than the rate of inflation.Public Safety Canada, who pays for 52 per cent of funding for Indigenous police forces (while the provinces pick up the remaining 48 per cent), declined to be interviewed for this story. In January of this year, they announced an increase in funding for Indigenous policing by nearly $300 million for nearly five years.“When you look at the crime statistics in communities that have the [Indigenous] policing program, you see a distinctly better pattern than elsewhere, so the program works, it simply needs to have more horsepower,” said Public Security Minister Ralph Goodale at a January press conference announcing the funding increase.The feds say a chunk of the new money will pay for some of that horsepower, including up to 110 additional police officers. But those new officers are to be spread out among 185 Indigenous police forces across Canada, an average of less than one officer per Indigenous police force. Which means the KRPF is in tough to get the 30 officers they say they need.“We’re way behind what the program is offering us, and we have to apply and we’re not sure if we will have some officers in Nunavik from that federal program,” said Larose.When asked about why $20 million isn’t enough, Larose adds that remote forces such as his have unique challenges. For instance, about 15 per cent, or $3.3 million a year of KRPF’s budget is spent on moving Inuit detainees back and forth from prison in southern Quebec to Nunavik for trial because there is nowhere to hold them long term in Nunavik.Sometimes an Inuit detainee will fly back and forth a half dozen times before their case is settled.Larose also points to KRPF’s high turnover rate and that training new officers costs them $20,000 more a year than other police forces as other reasons the existing budget doesn’t cut it.“I believe that the Inuit community deserves a good police force with all the services as they do back in the south. That’s why we are insisting in this agreement and we want what we ask for, it’s a must,” said Larose, who hopes to have to have a new agreement with the feds before the end of the year.(Elisapi Napartuk is the sister of Jobie Napartuk, who was killed by police in 2014. Photo: Tom Fennario/APTN)He also acknowledges that for many in Nunavik, the police have a public relations problem.Lucy Nowra puts it succinctly.“Inuit people don’t trust police because they think they’re gonna get shot.”But KRPF also have reason to be wary. Visit the Canadian police officer’s memorial in Ottawa, and you’ll see among the 850 names that of 27-year-old Steve Déry. In 2013, KRPF officer Déry was shot to death while responding to a domestic violence call in Kuujjuaq, QC.Another officer was seriously injured before the Inuk shooter took his own life.“It’s still in the memories,” said Larose when asked if the Déry murder hangs heavy over the KRPF.Larose says that, agreement or not, he has implemented new measures to reduce violence and regain trust in Nunavik’s 14 communities. He emphasizes that KRPF officers now receive sensitivity training from an Inuk Elder and increased efforts to recruit more Inuit officers are underway.“I can understand their mistrust because I understand what happened in the past. What I can tell them is that I am somebody who is very open minded and I believe in prevention and working with them. And our police officers also want to get involved and they want more good relations with the Inuit population,” concluded Larose.Lucy Nowra acknowledges that the police have a difficult job here. She would know, she’s had her own run ins with the law.“I started drinking a lot. Smoking a lot. It was my way of coping with the losses that I had. So it led me to drug dealing. In 2013, it was a way for me to get free drugs and alcohol. So I didn’t think of it that way and the impacts back then because I was younger, and then it all caught up to me, I got arrested and was sent to jail for six months.”Nowra has long since turned things around. Now a 30-year-old responsible mother to three who involves herself in the community, she is currently finishing cooking school. She just wishes that some of the people she knew, such as Jobie Napartuk, Jimmy Kingalik, Alakagiallak Nowkawalk, had gotten the same second chance.Which is why the self-described loud mouth decided to speak up. She felt somebody had to.“It’s very hard for Inuit to just complain because we’re usually people who forgive easily and forget,” said Nowra.But after years of violent confrontations, forgiving and forgetting isn’t coming easy.Most would agree the status quo only continues to worsen Nunavik’s frayed relationship with its own police force. And while change may be just over the horizon…in the vast isolated land of Nunavik, the horizon has a way of appearing very far away.tfennario@aptn.ca@tomfennario “It was really shocking for the community. It was like people were dying one after another in the hands of the police officers” – Lucy Nowra Tom FennarioAPTN InvestigatesThe cell phone video is gritty and the camera’s shakiness adds an ominous touch.In the video, the remnants of dusk are fading in what looks to be a remote community.A shadow can be glimpsed running on the gravel road beside a row of houses.A sharp rifle shot rings out, and the shadow, presumably a police officer, crouches behind a vehicle for cover. Tommy NingiukLucy Nowra filmed this from her window just across the street.“I live a few houses down and tried talking him out of it. But when I fell asleep this early morning he started shooting again,” wrote Nowra in a Facebook message to APTN Investigates mere hours after the incident.On Sept. 4, 2018, Tommy Ningiuk, 40, fired several shots from his home in Inukjuak, Qc.At one point he paused to send a selfie to Nowra during the 14 hour stand-off with police.In it Ningiuk is holding a hunting rifle, a thin smile on his face. Nowra’s phone shows that she missed a video call from Ningiuk just before 3:00 a.m.He also sent her a brief message near 8:00 a.m. that simply read “Hi.” By the time Lucy wrote him back at 12:30 p.m., he had died in an exchange of gunfire with the police.“I talked him out of it, but I fell asleep,” wrote Nowra, her words tinged with guilt. “I’m so hurt, another soul lost to this.”Most small towns like Inukjuak (population 1,600) would consider an armed stand-off with police an extraordinary event. But for Nowra, it’s not even the first time an armed stand-off has happened on her street.(Lucy Nowra is from Inukjuak. She thinks the police need to do more to prevent volatile situations from turning violent. Photo: Tom Fennario/APTN)In November 2015,  Peter Weetaluktuk, 18, was shot by police after brandishing his rifle.“It was that house, that brown one over there,” said Nowra in July of 2018, pointing to a house about 100 metres down her street.“That’s how close it was to our place.”Weetaluktuk survived the shooting, but others have not been so fortunate.Jobie Napartuk“Many people in town have been shot. Some of them have been killed,” said Nowra, who thinks Inuit are all too often blamed for getting shot. She believes that police need to do a better job diffusing situations that turn volatile.“It was really shocking for the community. It was like people were dying one after another in the hands of the police officers,” Nowra said.It started in 2014 when Elisapi Napartuk’s 29-year-old brother Jobie was shot and killed by police. She describes Jobie as good father who had an oddball sense of humour.“He could’ve lived more. He was only 29 years old. He had eight children, they were all under 18 years old and he left them,” lamented Napartuk.(Jobie Napartuk, pictured here with the youngest of his eight children, was 29 years old when he was shot and killed by police. Photo courtesy of the Napartuk family)Police were called to Jobie Naparktuk’s house “to ensure the safety of his family” according to the coroner’s report. He had traces of cannabis and more than two-and-a-half times the legal amount of alcohol in his system when he threw a frying pan and casserole dish at the officers, who then went outside to wait for back up, according to the coroner’s report.That’s when Napartuk came outside, this time brandishing knives. Officers ordered him to drop the knives but he refused and went back inside his house. Police followed him, fearing he may hurt someone inside, according to the report. Once inside they fatally shot him. After an investigation, police were found to have followed procedure despite  Jobie Napartuk’s  death.Many people in Inukjuak wonder to this day why deadly force was necessary. When asked what she felt the police could have done differently regarding her brother’s death Elisapi Napartuk said, “Not to shoot him, like, at least use a taser.”Members of the Kativik Regional Police Force (KRPF) shot Jobie Napartuk. They police Inukjuak and 13 other communities in Nunavik, what the Inuit call their territory in subarctic Quebec.A rash of KRPF incidents that led to injury and death prompted Inukjuak residents to band together in 2014.They demanded less deadly force including tasers to handle precarious situations. Kativik police in Inukjuak did eventually receive tasers, but not until four years later, in Spring 2018.“It’s really unacceptable to take this long,” said Nowra. “I’m sure some of them should’ve ended better, instead of fatally.”Allie and Jimmy KingalikNowra points to the Kingalik brothers as an example.Allie Kingalik was paralyzed by a police shooting in 2014. A year later his younger brother Jimmy was killed after he went into the Inukjuak police station with an ax.(Elisapi Kingalik (R) has had 2 sons shot by police. One is dead, the other has limited mobility from the waist down. Photo: Tom Fennario/APTN)Their mother Elisapi says 27-year-old Jimmy was angry about his brother’s shooting, but after a shed fire that left him severely burned to the point of being handicapped, she doesn’t see how Jimmy could’ve posed much of a threat to police.“He was weak. I don’t know why they did that to a person who was handicapped,” said Kingalik in Inuktitut. “They could’ve got a shield for themselves and then grabbed the weapon from him. They’ve could’ve asked for some assistance.“Why did they do that?”Aibillie Niviaxie was in a jail cell at the station when Jimmy Kingalik was shot. He recalls that from his vantage point, he was able to see the officers, but not Kingalik.“When Jimmy came into the police station, and they gave him three shots,” said Niviaxie, turning his hand into the shape of a hand gun, “and maybe he was trying to get up again and the police was screaming and shot him three times again.”The coroner’s report differs, saying police shot five times, hitting Kingalik with four bullets, the last of which killed him.The report does confirm, through security camera footage, that after being hit twice, Kingalik fell and tried to get up before being shot twice again. It also says there was no apparent motive for Jimmy to threaten KRPF officers with an ax, even though his brother had previously been paralyzed by a KRPF bullet.What the family has the most trouble grasping is why the police didn’t disarm a handicapped Jimmy after the first bullets knocked him down. Elisapi Kingalik said that she’s been waiting eagerly on the investigation being done on her son’s death to find out.But the investigation was completed in 2016, she just hadn’t been told about it.  Instead APTN Investigates informed her that the investigation has been concluded and that the officers had been found to be acting correctly.“So no one will explain to me who was at fault?” Kingalik asked, seemingly to no one and everyone at the same time.(Aibille Niviaxie witnessed the police shooting of Jimmy Kingalik. Photo: Tom Fennario/APTN)One person who might be able to answer is Jean-Pierre Larose. With nearly 40 years of experience in policing, Larose took over the post of KRPF Chief in February. He says equipment and training for less lethal force are being introduced, but that it’s not as simple as handing officers a taser.“We can use it in certain circumstances and I’m aware of that, especially up north when Inuit have parkas outside, there’s no effect on them, the tasers, so we are looking into some alternative impact weapons right now,” Larose explainedHe also adds that he’s implementing more follow up care after violence, for both police and family. Specifically, Larose says he’s spoken to the body that investigates police shootings, the Bureau des Enquêtes Indépendantes (BEI) about reporting back to family members such as Elisapi Kingalik.“I explained to them the importance of explaining of what’s going on, what’s going to be the investigation, not only with the family but with the town council,” Larose stated.Alakagiallak NowkawalkBut for some families, there’s no solace to be had. In 2015, 23-year-old Alakagiallak Nowkawalk fired a shot in his girlfriend’s direction after she left his house following an argument. It set into motion a three day stand-off with police that led to Alakagiallak’s death. It was ruled a suicide: something the Nowkawalk family refuses to accept.(Alakagiallak Nowkawalk died after a 3 day stand off with police. His death was ruled a suicide, but his family thinks differently. Photo courtesy of the Nowkawalk family)Charlie Nowkawalk, Alakagiallak’s uncle, says the family’s doubts come from examining his corpse. What doesn’t make sense to Charlie, an experienced hunter, is that there was no exit wound.“I checked the body, I looked at the body, I even took some pictures of the body and there was a little teeny, tiny hole right there right in the centre and nothing in the back,” Charlie said, pointing towards his sternum.Quebec’s provincial police, who took over from the local Kativik police during the stand-off, told the coroner that Alakagiallak turned the gun on himself after they stormed the house.The report states they took that drastic action after 28 hours of negotiations went nowhere. Also according to the coroner report, Alakagiallak had a burn on his chest that indicates he was shot from very close, or even point blank range with a Tikka brand .223 found near his body. But Charlie said the rifle his nephew used to allegedly kill himself was too powerful to not leave an exit wound.Charlie is also convinced that his nephew didn’t own a .223 rifle, but rather an even more powerful .243 rifle.“If he used that big rifle, .243 which we use for caribou hunting or big game hunting, that’s a strong rifle. If he used that there would have been a big hole in his back,” said Charlie, who frequently hunted with Alakagiallak.Alakagiallak Nowkawalk’s mother Minnie Nowkawalk is sitting on her couch next to her husband Noah Ehalook. He comforts Minnie frequently as she repeatedly breaks into tears while discussing the death of their son. Chief among Minnie’s complaints are that negotiations with Alakagiallak were handled poorly.“They work alone, we weren’t even able to phone him. Only the police were able to call him,” Nowkawalk said in Inuktitut.Neither the KRPF nor Quebec provincial police have negotiators who speak in Inuktitut, the mother tongue of the vast majority of Inuit. Out of 48 KRPF patrol officers, three are Inuit.“There was absolutely no help between my son and the police. Both sides were lacking help,” said Minnie Nowkawalk.Lucy Nowra says that she has firsthand experience that Inuk negotiators work. When she heard on the local radio that there was yet another stand-off with police, she drove to the house where it was happening.“Three police trucks were blocking the road. They were stopping us from going in but I just passed them, I went in and I continued. I didn’t care if they were going to arrest me. I was thinking ‘my God, I don’t want to lose another person I don’t want to lose another family member,’” recalled Nowra.When asked about getting Inuktitut speaking negotiators for perilous situations, KRPF Chief Larose wasn’t sure how it could be implemented, but stopped short of dismissing the idea.“There’s special rules. It’s the SQ [Quebec Provincial Police] that takes over the operation and they have their own negotiator. But I think that it would be effective to maybe have an Elder, maybe beside the negotiators, to get involved. I don’t know but it would be interesting to have that right away in the community, to have somebody close to the negotiator to help us,” Larose said.“Our culture is different from Qallunaat, white people’s culture, it would be more comfortable to speak with an Inuk who’s understanding, rather than someone else, who’s white who wouldn’t understand what I’m going through or what I’m trying to say,” explained Nowra.It’s impossible to know if Inuktitut speaking negotiators or translators would’ve helped Jobie Napartuk, Jimmy Kingalik, or Alakagiallak Nowkawalk, who all died violently less than a year a part.What is known is that since then there have been others all over Nunavik. From July 2016 to Tommy Ningiuk in September 2018 Kativik police were involved in about 10 percent of all cases where police kill or seriously injure people in Quebec. That’s third in the province out of 26 police forces and, according to CBC research into police shootings, the most fatalities for any Indigenous police force in Canada during that time.For perspective, KRPF has had nearly half as many officer-involved fatality cases as the Montreal police. yet they KRPF officers police an equivalent of less than one per cent of Montreal’s population. Crunch the numbers, and the rate the KRPF kills or injures someone is 55 times that of Montreal police.last_img
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Most actively traded companies on the TSX

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first_imgSome of the most active companies traded Wednesday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (15,171.25, up 227.16 points).Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Health care. Up 62 cents, or 8.5 per cent, to $7.91 on 13.2 million shares.Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B). Down 12 cents, or 5.33 per cent, to $2.13 on 10.9 million shares.Crescent Point Energy Corp. (TSX:CPG). Energy. Down 26 cents, or 6.12 per cent, to $3.99 on 8.7 million shares.Aphria Inc. (TSX:APH). Health care. Up $1.06, or 10.3 per cent, to $11.35 on 5.7 million shares.Bank of Nova Scotia. (TSX:BNS). Financials. Up $1.98, or 2.82 per cent, to $72.13 on 5.3 million shares.Encana Corp. (TSX:ECA). Energy. Up one cent, or 0.11 per cent, to $9.15 on 5.3 million shares.Companies reporting major news:Hudson’s Bay Co. (TSX:HBC). Up 73 cents or 9.3 per cent to $8.60. Activist investor Land and Buildings Investment Management LLC is attacking the Toronto-based retailer’s board again for failing to take decisive action to unlock value for shareholders. In a letter sent to shareholders, Land and Buildings says it believes HBC could double or triple its share price and find benefits by selling Saks Fifth Avenue to a luxury department store company, its remaining 50 per cent interest in its European business to Signa Holding GmbH, and Lord and Taylor to a mass merchant. It also believes HBC should pursue real estate investment trust status for its Canadian real estate and sublease excess space at its Bay department stores.Royal Bank of Canada. (TSX:RY). Up $2.61 or 2.7 per cent to $98.10. The Royal Bank’s latest quarterly earnings beat expectations with a 15 per cent jump in net income, helped by rising interest rates and U.S. tax reforms, to cap off a year where the lender generated a record annual profit of $12.4 billion. The Toronto-based bank delivered quarterly net income of $3.25 billion or $2.20 per diluted share, up from $1.88 per share a year ago.Newstrike Brands Ltd. (TSXV:HIP). Up one cent to 45 cents. The Cannabis company struck a deal to create co-branded edibles with specialty foods company Neal Brothers Inc., best known for its chips and salsa. Newstrike will own 60 per cent and Neal Brothers will own 40 per cent of a joint venture that will manufacture, distribute, market and sell cannabis-infused products. The joint venture partners will develop edible cannabis products at Newstrike’s licensed operation in the Niagara community of Lincoln, Ont. Alimentation Couche-Tard Inc. (TSX:ATD.B). Up $3.18 or 4.8 per cent to $68.93. Couche-Tard says it is keeping an eye on its policies around “lower risk” smoking products after controversial flavoured e-cigarette maker Juul Labs yanked mango, fruit and cucumber flavoured pods from U.S. shelves in a bid to reduce their appeal to minors. The convenience store chain’s CEO Brian Hannasch said Couche-Tard is “excited” by the growth of the market for such tobacco alternatives, but is also watching them closely because products like Juul are “probably too successful” because too many minors have been able to obtain them.The Canadian Presslast_img
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Poisoning claims divorce spat in Arizona journalism saga

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first_imgPRESCOTT, Ariz. — The owner of a chain of small Arizona newspapers and his wife are locked in a bizarre divorce case that includes allegations of poisoning.Prosecutors have cleared Felice Soldwedel of any wrongdoing in the alleged scheme.But that hasn’t stopped Joseph Soldwedel from pursuing his claims in civil court and chronicling them in his company’s newspaper that serves Prescott, north of Phoenix.Journalism experts say it’s unethical to use the newspaper’s resources to pursue a personal vendetta. He says he has an obligation to readers to make the accusations public and ensure law enforcement thoroughly investigates.Felice Soldwedel calls her husband’s claims ludicrous and believes he’s retaliating against her because she filed for divorce last year.Joseph Soldwedel has run Western News and Info Inc. for more than three decades.Felicia Fonseca, The Associated Presslast_img
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Friends say homeowner missing after house burns down on Highway 29

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first_imgThe post added that Banky’s pickup truck was discovered with fire damage on the road to Lakepoint Golf and Country Club, while his dog Max was found in Fort St. John on Monday morning. Banky is reportedly still missing.A member of the Fort St. John RCMP confirmed this morning that that RCMP’s Major Crimes Unit is actively investigating the situation, adding that more information is due to be released later today. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Friends of a man living west of Charlie Lake are concerned for his well-being after his house on Highway 29 burned down over the Easter weekend.According to a news tip submitted via social media, a fire occurred at the mobile home on Highway 29 belonging to a Mr. John Banky on the night of March 29th. A friend of Mr. Banky’s said in a Facebook post that Banky, his dog, and his late model red Toyota Tundra pickup truck were missing from the property after the fire.A submitted photo of John Banky and his dog Max.last_img
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UNbacked group issues recommendations on advancing Africas development

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1 July 2008International development leaders today issued a series of recommendations in such areas as agriculture, education, health and infrastructure to speed up Africa’s progress towards reaching the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDG), eight anti-poverty targets with a 2015 deadline. Deputy Secretary-General Asha-Rose Migiro and other officials launched a report of the MDG Africa Steering Group – comprising the leaders of multilateral development organizations – today containing these recommendations on the final day of the African Union (AU) Summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt.Regarding agriculture, the Steering Group called for the international community to mobilize over $750 million to help the continent meet short-term needs that have arisen due to soaring food prices. It also urged African governments to work with global partners to launch a Green Revolution on the continent.While some African nations are on the way to achieving universal primary education by 2015, others have not made as much progress. The report said African leaders should prioritize establishing strong systems to track steps towards achieving education targets.“Africa as a whole is off track to meeting the MDGs on reducing child mortality, improving maternal health and combating infectious disease,” the Steering Group noted. “Yet, experiences from other continents, as well as recent progress in several countries in the region, prove that the Goals can be achieved across Africa.”The report also included recommendations on national statistical systems and aid effectiveness and predictability.Also at today’s launch were AU Chairperson Jakaya Kikwete, AU Commission Chairperson Jean Ping and AU Commissioner for Economic Affairs Maxwell Mkwezalamba.The Steering Group – which is chaired by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon – was set up last September after data showed that despite faster growth and strengthened institutions, Africa remains off-track to meeting the targets.
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Assassination attempt on President is attack on all Somalis UN says

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29 October 2009Two recent attempts to kill Somali President Sharif Sheikh Ahmed are assassination attacks on all Somalis, the top United Nations official for the strife-torn country said today. “After failing at an attempted coup in May – act strongly condemned by the whole of the international community – extremists are again trying to terrorize the Somali people and wreak further havoc on the nation,” Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s Special Representative Ahmedou Ould-Abdallah said in a news release.Extremists yesterday tried to assassinate the president as he was returning to Mogadishu. This followed a similar attempt last Thursday at Mogadishu airport as he boarded a plane for Uganda to attend an African summit.“Resorting to political assassinations that kill innocent Somali bystanders, including women and children, is not only condemnable but absolutely not the way to access power,” Mr. Ould-Abdallah said.“Committing suicide goes against all religious teachings,” he added, citing a verse from the Koran: “Do not kill yourselves, for truly Allah has been to you most merciful. If any do that in rancour and injustice, soon shall we cast him into the fire.”He stressed: “An assassination attempt on the life of the President is also an assassination attempt on all Somalis, as it undermines the efforts of those who have been struggling for some semblance of normalcy and stability for so long.” “Those who ordered and those who carried out these assassination attempts clearly have no intention of participating in dialogue or any interest in contributing to the peace process in Somalia or in the region.” The Transitional Federal Government (TFG) headed by Mr. Ahmed is battling Islamist extremists in a country that has been ravaged by factional fighting and has not had a functioning central government since 1991.
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Tablets being smuggled to Sri Lanka seized one held

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As the tablets should be sold only by an authorised medical dealer, that too on doctors’ prescriptions, the police registered a First Information Report (FIR) against Rajendran. He was arrested and later remanded in judicial custody, the police said. A special team, led by the ASP, waited for more than an hour for the receiver to turn up after the bus reached Ramanathapuram on Sunday morning, and arrested him when he took possession of the consignment. Ramanathapuram Town police have seized tablets, mostly pain killers and pregnancy termination tablets, and arrested a person, who took possession of the medicines, clandestinely transported from Chennai in a bus, for smuggling them to Sri Lanka, The Hindu newspaper reported.Acting on the orders of Superintendent of Police N. Manivannan, who received a tip -ff about the illegal transportation of the medicines, Assistant Superintendent of Police S. Sarvesh Raj arrested V. Rajendran (35) and seized the medicines. The tablets were found packed in 150 cartons, Mr Sarvesh Raj said.Interrogation revealed that the medicines were despatched in the private bus by one Khader in Chennai. He had asked Rajendran to receive the consignment and hand it over to a Sri Lankan Tamil, David, in Rameswaram. David, who was planning to smuggle the medicines through the sea route to Sri Lanka, was absconding, the police said. (Colombo Gazette)
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Iraq with hundreds killed in April UN expresses deep concern at incessant

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“It pains us to see the continuing bloodletting and loss of life, particularly among civilians who are paying a high price as a result of bombings and the armed clashes”, said the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Iraq, Mr. Ján Kubiš, stressing his deep concern at the incessant violence. “Terrorists have used suicide attacks to target cafés, places of worship, pilgrims and markets in a wicked, unrelenting campaign to cause maximum casualties and inflict untold suffering on the population”, he added. Looking at civilian casualties, UNAMI indicated that 410 were killed and 973 were injured, while a total of 331 members of the Iraqi Security Forces (including Peshmerga, SWAT and militias fighting alongside the Iraqi Army but excluding Anbar Operations) were killed and 401 were injured. The overall casualty figures are down from the previous month of March, where a total of 1,119 were killed and 1,561 were injured. In April, Baghdad was the worst affected Governorate with 874 civilian casualties.
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Brock to host lab tours as national funding announced

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It’s pretty easy to monitor a moose or a bear when studying their foraging and mating patterns over a few years: just clip some kind of label or tracking device onto one of their body parts.But what if you’re observing a specific bee over time? Do you attach a label onto one of its little legs?Brock University bee expert Miriam Richards will be explaining her research to Members of Parliament Chris Bittle and Vance Badawey on Tuesday, Oct. 9 at 2 p.m. as part of a tour in Brock’s Cairns Family Health and Bioscience Research Complex.Bittle and Badawey are visiting Brock University on the day the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) is set to announce significant funding for scientists nation-wide, including those at Brock University.At 1:30 p.m., Bittle and Badawey, along with Brock Vice-President, Research Tim Kenyon, will be meeting informally with researchers who received grants from the federal government’s science research funding agency.
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Poll How do you pronounce the creme in Creme Egg

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first_img Image: Shutterstock/Craig Russell By Fora Staff Feb 22nd 2018, 12:43 PM Share7 Tweet Email 57 Comments 30,244 Views Short URL I don't like to talk about it (464) https://jrnl.ie/3866027 Image: Shutterstock/Craig Russellcenter_img CremCreamI don't like to talk about itVote Poll Results: Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Crem (697) Poll: How do you pronounce the 'creme' in Creme Egg? Give it to us straight. Be honest. Thursday 22 Feb 2018, 12:43 PM Cream (11165) THERE WAS A bit of a panic yesterday when Cadburys tweeted that the ‘creme’ in Creme Egg should be pronounced ‘Crem’.They quickly took that back and said it was a typo and that it should be pronounced as ‘Cream’.Was there ever a doubt in your mind though?How do you pronounce the ‘creme’ bit?last_img
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Your crash course in The rise and fall of the Willy Wonka

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first_img http://jrnl.ie/3102196 Demo failuresPerhaps the most high-profile misfire in Steorn’s history occurred in 2007. An early prototype of Orbo, its everlasting power device, was to be showcased at a demo, but it failed and Steorn cancelled the exhibit.The malfunction was blamed on “excessive heat from the lighting in the main display area”.“I screwed up,” McCarthy said in a Q&A afterwards, explaining that it had been functioning the days before. “It was a mistake entirely of my making … I have to take it on the chin.” Steorn's notice in the Kinetica Museum Source: Salim Fadhley/FlickrHe promised to demo the device at a later date and hosted a series of exhibitions in the Waterways Centre in Dublin during 2009 and 2010.McCarthy’s talk at the exhibition – billed under the daunting title ‘Orbo Electromagnetic Interaction COP > 1 –  supposedly proved the existence of ‘overunity’, otherwise known as perpetual motion.Using a oscilloscope device, which is used to measure the change of an electrical signal over time, he claimed that more energy was coming out of Orbo than was going in. Engineers were not convinced that McCarthy had proved anything.ProductsUndaunted, Steorn later launched two consumer products: the OCube, an everlasting USB charging device, and the O-Phone, a simple mobile phone that never needs to be charged.The cube retailed at €1,200, while the phone cost €480. The company started taking orders in late 2015 for delivery in mid-2016.In January of this year, The Irish Times visited Steorn’s East Wall headquarters to have a look at the OCube production line.“This is, in many ways, a self-resolving controversy,” McCarthy told the newspaper. “Ultimately, the controversy that surrounds the fundamental claim of the technology is going to be resolved by consumers, not by us.”In other words, Steorn relied on customers with cash to burn to take a punt on the product and prove that it worked. Steorn's Ocube device Source: Frank Acland/YouTubeMcCarthy said he had disengaged with the scientific community and revealed that he wasn’t entirely sure how the free energy anomaly worked himself.“We think that we’re converting time into energy … that’s the engineering principle,” he said.“Do we understand the science? No, but we don’t understand gravity either.”McCarthy also said that he never claimed to have created a perpetual motion machine. ”It’s not a machine,” he said. “(It’s) a battery that self-charges.”The Sunday Business Post reported in July that the firm had withdrawn from sales of the two devices because many of the shipped devices didn’t work.A letter seen by the newspaper said that Steorn was “a prospect that has been oversold to its investors … based on a naive optimism on time frames for tasks to be completed”.What next?Steorn has always been loss-making. Its most recent accounts show that it made a loss of €88,600 for the financial year ended 31 December 2014, pushing accumulated losses to more than €20.5 million.The Sunday Business Post reported that it had tapped up investors this summer for more money, saying that it would be forced to wind-down the business otherwise.However company filings to date show the last time shares for Steorn changed hands was in April 2013, when a stake was sold for €1.74 million to a group called The Steorn Orbo Trust.The article also said that McCarthy had stepped down as chief executive, provisionally handing over the reins although he was due to stay on as operations officer.Two weeks ago, the newspaper confirmed in an interview with McCarthy that Steorn had finally shut up shop and is to be liquidated. He said the company had no other choice because investment had dried up.“It’s not that our existing investors didn’t show willingness to give more support,” he said, “but their capability to give support just kept diminishing.”He said that would now earn a living through online poker and described himself as “unemployable” because of his association with Steorn. Saturday 26 Nov 2016, 7:45 AM Get Fora’s NEW daily digest of the morning’s key business news: HE WAS CALLED the ‘Willy Wonka of energy’ and claimed to have defied the laws of physics.But after 16 years in operation, Shaun McCarthy confirmed in a recent Sunday Business Post interview that his controversial tech firm, Steorn, has shut its doors and will be liquidated.The company claimed to have created an everlasting battery device that generated energy from nothing, as well as a mobile phone that never needed to be charged.Even though its technology was lampooned by sceptics, Steorn managed to raise a reported €23 million from 400 private investors throughout the last decade.With that in mind, let’s look at the rise and spectacular fall of Steorn, the company that tried to kill the battery.‘Discovery’Steorn set up shop in 2000, initially cashing in on the dot-com boom and working on a number of e-commerce platforms.It was co-founded by engineer Shaun McCarthy, consultant Mike Daly, solicitor Francis Hackett and Shaun Menzies, of tech recruitment firm Zartis, who, incidentally, once travelled to the South Pole.One of Steorn’s early projects was WorldofFruit.com, a much-hyped but ill-fated fruit trading site created by Fyffes.A testament to the madness of the dot-com days, Fyffes’ company secretary at the time said it planned to float WorldofFruit on the Nasdaq market and projected $300 million in annual sales. Instead it lost nearly €5 million in its first year of trading when the bubble finally burst. Steorn CEO Shaun McCarthy Source: Niall Carson/PA Archive/PA ImagesBy 2006, Steorn had moved on from building internet platforms and shifted its focus onto the consumer electronics market. It said it was developing a device that would lengthen a mobile phone’s battery life.The ‘eureka’ moment occurred three years earlier, according to an interview with McCarthy in The Guardian.Steorn had been recruited by a bank to develop a system to prevent ‘skimming’, which is when an ATM machine is compromised to counterfeit cards and PIN codes.The firm claimed to have invented a device made up of 16 mini CCTV cameras that could record the identity of fraudsters and catch them red-handed.McCarthy told the newspaper: “We wanted the cameras to be independently powered, so we tried out small solar and ambient wind generators. 23,480 Views Your crash course in... The rise and fall of the 'Willy Wonka' energy firm that claimed to defy physics The company, set up by the ‘Willy Wonka of energy’, reportedly raised €23m from investors. Share55 Tweet Email1 “The general perception is (that I’m either) a conman or an idiot because clearly the tech can’t work,” he said.That said, he didn’t write off Steorn’s technology completely and insisted that it still had potential.“Whoever the liquidator turns out to be, hopefully will get a bidding war for it,” he said.Written by Conor McMahon and posted on Fora.ie Short URL Nov 26th 2016, 7:45 AM Take me to Fora Whoops! We couldn't find this Tweet By Fora Staff 21 Comments “We wanted to improve the performance of the wind generators – they were only about 60-70% efficient – so we experimented with certain generator configurations and then one day one of our guys came in and said: ‘We have a problem. We appear to be getting out more than we’re putting in’.”That was the moment Steorn ‘discovered’ it could use magnets to basically create a perpetual motion machine – a mythical contraption that has fascinated inventors for decades and can supposedly defy the laws of thermodynamics, generating energy from nothing.Just to put that into context, so-called ‘free energy’ would be a monumental discovery – it would eliminate the need to burn fossil fuels and make electricity cheaper and more accessible to people around the world.The author of The Guardian article goes on to reveal that none of the eight electrical engineers and academics “with multiple PhDs” that McCarthy cited would go on the record to confirm they had validated the contraction. Nor would the company that had partnered with Steorn to manufacture a prototype.The journalist was also promised a diagram explaining how exactly the system worked but it is never delivered because of concerns about intellectual property rights.That Economist adIn August 2006, McCarthy took out an infamous full-page ad in The Economist newspaper, which he said cost him £75,000 at the time, or about €88,000 by today’s exchange rate.Emblazoned with a bold quote from George Bernard Shaw – “All great truths begin as blasphemies” – Steorn claimed to have created a technology that “produces free, clean and constant energy”  and was “independently validated” by engineers and scientists – “always behind closed doors, always off the record”.The ad invited scientists to test the battery device for themselves.“We are seeking a jury of 12,” it said. “The most qualified and the most cynical.”Michio Kaku was one of many physicists that dubbed Steorn’s device “a fraud” before the gadget was even tested.“This company here does not use fancy superconductors or lasers, it’s just a simple magnet machine,” he told ABC News at the time.In the end, a jury of 22 scientists – whittled down from 420 – took McCarthy’s challenge.It announced in 2009 that it had wound down its investigation after finding no evidence that the Steorn contraption worked.“Steorn’s attempts to demonstrate the claim have not shown the production of energy,” the group wrote in a statement. 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Rape case against Theophanous officially dropped

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram The Director of Public Prosecutions Jeremy Rapke, QC, decided not to pursue further the rape charge against former Victorian minister Theo Theophanous. The decision follows a committal hearing that lasted over two weeks in late July this year where magistrate Peter Reardon found that there was no basis to send the case to a trial. Mr Theophanous was accused by a woman who now lives in Greece that she was raped in his Parliament office more than ten years ago. He was charged with one count of rape on Christmas eve last year. The magistrate had found the woman’s allegations unreliable and had also questioned the validity of other corroborating testimony. Until now it wasn’t clear if the state’s prosecutor would exercise his lawful rights to commit the case to a trial.last_img
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Des gorilles de montagne victimes de maladies humaines

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first_imgDes gorilles de montagne victimes de maladies humainesPubliée dans la revue Emerging Infectious Diseases, une étude américano-rwandaise montre que deux gorilles de montagne sauvages sont morts en 2009, contaminés par des humains porteurs d’une maladie respiratoire, ce qui confirme une transmission inter-espèces."Parce qu'il y a moins de 800 gorilles de montagne vivants, chaque individu est d'une importance cruciale pour la survie de l'espèce. Mais ces gorilles vivent entourés d’humains, et la présente découverte montre clairement que vivre dans des parcs nationaux protégés n'est pas un obstacle aux maladies humaines", affirme Mike Cranfield, de l’Université de Californie à Davis, directeur exécutif du Projet vétérinaire pour le gorille de montagne, un organisme sans buts lucratifs associant les scientifiques de plusieurs universités américaines et les services de développement rwandais.À lire aussiDengue : symptômes, traitement, prévention, où en est-on ?L’équipe a découvert que, au sein d’un groupe de gorilles de montagne du Rwanda ayant connu en 2008 et 2009 des épidémies de maladies respiratoires, 11 animaux sur 12 ont été atteints, et 2 ont succombé – une femelle adulte et un nouveau-né. L’analyse des tissus a montré la signature biochimique d'un virus appelé métapneumovirus humain (hMPV).Humains et gorilles partagent environ 98% de leur ADN, une proximité génétique préoccupante à cause des risques de transmission de maladies infectieuses humaines à ces animaux. Au cours des 100 dernières années, les contacts entre les deux espèces se sont multipliés. En fait, les parcs nationaux où les gorilles sont protégés (au Rwanda, en Ouganda et en République démocratique du Congo) sont entourés par les populations humaines les plus denses d’Afrique continentale. De plus, le tourisme amène de plus en plus de monde sur l’habitat des grands singes. Le 3 avril 2011 à 15:14 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img
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Emery warns Arsenal to expect physical test against Brighton

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first_imgArsenal manager Unai Emery has told his players to expect a similar physical battle to Burnley when they face Brighton on Wednesday.The Gunners defeated Burnley 3-1 on Saturday with Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang, who scored a brace, claiming he had never played in a game that was so physical.There were a number of incidents involving physical challenges and Clarets manager Sean Dyche afterwards accused Arsenal players of diving.The win was enough to take Arsenal level on points with fourth-placed Chelsea and Emery expects Brighton to offer a similar challenge to his players.“Brighton is the same, a very tough match physically, very organised and, like with Burnley, a very good coach who is working very well.” Emery said, according to BTSport.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath - September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League's match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a...“It is a challenge and I respect those teams a lot because they also have good players. They decide to do a line-up with physical players with a lot of crosses for the strikers for heading in our box.”“We need to defend very far in our box to defend better against that.”The challenge for Unai Emery’s men, who lost to Brighton last season, is made more difficult due to a defensive injury crisis, with Rob Holding, Konstantinos Mavropanos, Hector Bellerin and Nacho Monreal all out with injuries.last_img
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True crime writer reacts to Richard Sepolio verdict

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first_imgTrue crime writer reacts to Richard Sepolio verdict Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, February 14, 2019 Posted: February 14, 2019 KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (CNS) – A Navy petty officer who was behind the wheel of a pickup truck that plummeted over the side of a transition ramp to the San Diego- Coronado Bridge and landed in Chicano Park, killing four people, was convicted Wednesday of vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated.In addition to the four manslaughter counts, Richard Anthony Sepolio, 27, was found guilty of DUI causing injury. Jurors acquitted Sepolio of four counts of gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicted, seven counts of reckless driving and one count of driving over the legal alcohol limit and causing injury.Sepolio faces up to 18 years in prison, with sentencing scheduled for April 2.True crime writer and legal analyst of criminal cases, Aleida Wahn, came on Good Morning San Diego to discuss the verdict and what to expect at the sentencing. last_img
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AWS Step Functions Gains Callback Patterns to Resume Paused Workflows

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first_imgAmazon Web Services (AWS) recently announced that AWS Step Functions supports callback patterns to "automate workflows for applications with human activities and custom integrations with third-party services". Workflow executions can now be paused until applications return a token via the Step Functions API, which obsoletes the previously required polling or other workarounds.AWS Step Functions enables application developers to "coordinate multiple AWS services into serverless workflows" (previous coverage). Step Functions workflows are defined in the JSON-based Amazon States Language, which allows to maintain state machines via configuration as code, yet also to visualize state machine diagrams so that they are "easy to understand, easy to explain to others, and easy to change". Workflows are composed of states and tasks, which initially allowed to use AWS Lambda functions and (potentially long-running) activities for the actual work, and since late 2018 also supports several other service integrations like DynamoDB, ECS, SNS, and SQS (previous coverage).To enable the pausing of workflow executions until an external activity has been completed, Step Functions has so far required to poll the Step Functions API via activity workers. However, besides requiring upfront registration of the activity, and extra care to avoid latency when polling for activity tasks, implementing serverless approval steps also required to work around the polling architecture with a scheduled Lambda function.AWS has now added a dedicated wait for a callback with a task token service integration pattern that complements the default request response and wait for a job to complete patterns to enable purely event-driven serverless workflows with manual steps and third-party integrations. The provided example workflow covers a scenario that needs to "integrate with an external microservice to perform a credit check as a part of an approval workflow": Image: Wait for callback with task token example workflow (via Step Functions documentation)A complete task definition using the Amazon SQS service integration might look as follows:"Send message to SQS":{ "Type":"Task", "Resource":"arn:aws:states:::sqs:sendMessage.waitForTaskToken", "Parameters":{ "QueueUrl":"https://sqs.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/123456789012/myQueue", "MessageBody":{ "Message":"Hello from Step Functions!", "TaskToken.$":"$$.Task.Token" } }, "Next":"NEXT_STATE"}The .WaitForTaskToken suffix selects the callback pattern, and the $$.Task.Token reference injects the value of the task token from the context object during workflow execution. A consumer of the resulting SQS message can then resume the paused workflow and report the outcome of an external process via the SendTaskSuccess or SendTaskFailure API actions. Because "a task that is waiting for a task token will wait until the execution reaches the one year service limit", AWS recommends to configure a heartbeat timeout. The heartbeat timeout clock can then be reset via the SendTaskHeartbeat API action to report that "the task represented by the specified taskToken is still making progress".AWS Serverless Hero Ben Kehoe has just covered a common use case with a blog post on using callback URLs for approval emails with AWS Step Functions. His sfn-callback-urls solution is implemented as a serverless application and published to the Serverless Application Repository (previous coverage). It allows to "generate one-time-use callback URLs" and is exemplified with a workflow that "sends an email containing approve/reject links, and later a confirmation email". Kehoe emphasizes that it is easy to "expand this state machine for your use cases", and that this workflow pattern can also be "used as part of a larger state machine".Netflix has built the conceptually similar JSON DSL based open-source workflow orchestration engine Conductor, which features a wait task that can be updated via HTTP to implement callbacks from external triggers. Microsoft Azure provides an HTTP webhook action to allow pausing and resuming an app via its Logic Apps workflow orchestration service.In related news, AWS Step Functions has recently added support for nested workflows, added access to workflow metadata, and now also supports workflow execution events via CloudWatch Events respectively Amazon EventBridge (previous coverage), which eases building auxiliary serverless workflows by monitoring state machine events like start, success, or failure. Earlier this year, AWS Step Functions Local has been made available as an executable JAR package and Docker image to enable implementing and testing of state machines in development and build environments.The AWS Step Functions documentation features a developer guide, including a section on service integration patterns, the Amazon States Language, and the API reference. The AWS CLI Step Functions commands and the Amazon States Language specification are documented separately. Support is provided via the AWS Step Functions forum. Callback patterns are available at no additional charge beyond the regular usage-based AWS Step Functions pricing.last_img
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Madore Elected officials need to apologize to voters

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first_imgClark County Commissioner David Madore will soon introduce a resolution for his fellow commissioners to consider that “apologizes for breaking faith with the citizens of Clark County,” declares the county will “notify the appropriate authorities that we have not acted with integrity,” calls for an investigation into the Columbia River Crossing, and formally requests funding for the project be withdrawn at local, state and federal levels.Madore announced at Tuesday’s regular commission meeting that he will introduce the resolution.“This addresses the situation we find ourselves in as elected officials, and what’s unfolded over the last several weeks and really the last several months regarding the future of our community and the biggest project in our history and how that’s handled,” Madore said.At the heart of the matter is the September decision by the C-Tran Board of Directors — on which all three commissioners sit — to operate light rail on what is now an Oregon-led Columbia River Crossing project.The C-Tran board voted 5-4 in favor of the funding plan. The three county commissioners split their votes, with Democrat Steve Stuart voting yes and Republicans Tom Mielke and Madore voting no.Since then, Madore has been outspoken in his continued fight against the plan in public meetings and on his Facebook wall.The resolution won’t be officially presented to commissioners for at least another two weeks, but Madore chose to read it into the record during Tuesday’s commissioner communications.last_img
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Car burglarized at West MiamiDade school

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first_imgWEST MIAMI-DADE, FLA. (WSVN) - Surveillance footage at a West Miami-Dade school’s parking lot caught a man smashing the window of a car and taking a woman’s purse.The man is seen peeking into the backseat and smashing the window of a car parked at Somerset Academy’s West Campus on Southwest 16th Street and 59th Avenue, around 2 p.m., Aug. 15. He then took off in a car with a woman’s purse containing her wallet and glasses.Police said the thief has struck before, and they’re concerned he will strike again.If you have any information on this burglary, call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $1,000 reward.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img
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