Trump opioid plan vague, lacks funding

first_imgHe explained to a House committee on Wednesday that there is a “difference between a physical dependence and an addiction.”Many patients successfully overcome their addiction to opioids with a managed course of methadone or buprenorphine while undergoing counseling.The FDA is looking into ways to allow medication-assisted therapy to be prescribed more widely, and to reflect that some people may need to be treated for life.Getting the therapy to the millions of Americans who need it will take a concerted, well-funded effort by the federal government and the states.The president’s own commission on opioid addiction is reportedly considering calling for wider use of the treatment in its forthcoming report.If so, Trump should heed its recommendation and direct his administration to act accordingly. He also promised to seal the borders against illegal drugs and to prosecute traffickers.Absent from this list is something called medication-assisted therapy.The treatment uses methadone and buprenorphine to safely help addicts through recovery, prevent fatal overdoses and enable people to work and live normal lives, studies and experience show.Yet the U.S. government restricts their use to specially trained doctors, who can treat only a limited number of patients.And too many Americans believe the myth that prescribing methadone or buprenorphine — both opioids — simply replaces one addiction for another, and that it’s better for addicts to simply abstain.Trump’s former secretary of Health and Human Services questioned the value of medication-assisted therapy, and insurance companies have been reluctant to cover it.Fortunately, Scott Gottlieb, head of the Food and Drug Administration, realizes the value of the treatment. In sweeping if vague terms, President Donald Trump on Thursday declared opioid addiction a “national health emergency.” What he didn’t do is talk about one of the most effective ways to address it —or how much it would all cost.The strategy Trump outlined includes training doctors to prescribe painkillers more carefully, encouraging scientists to create nonaddictive alternatives, urging children not to start taking opioids and using drug courts to help the addicted find treatment. Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared on Bloomberg View: More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

Tax plan will benefit taxpayers in the end

first_imgThe 2017 Tax Cut & Jobs Act is not polling well with the American people.  That’s not surprising at this stage of tax reform.  Ronald Reagan’s 1986 tax reform had only an 18 percent favorability rating the day it passed.  The average taxpayer doesn’t believe tax cuts for corporations will benefit him or her. What they don’t realize is corporations are just pass-through entities for their corporate taxes. Corporations don’t pay taxes. Workers pay it in lower wages and/or customers pay it in higher prices for goods and services. The combination of lower corporate taxes and switching to a territorial tax system (like the rest of the world), which only taxes corporate profits once wherever they are earned globally, will have a very beneficial effect on the American economy. I humbly predict that this tax reform will eventually be very popular with American taxpayers.  My thank you to President Trump and the Republican Party. #MAGA.Bob LindingerGuilderlandMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesAlbany County warns of COVID increase Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Liberals can’t take Trump’s straight talk

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionI admit that the language the president used was a bit much for the snowflake PC crowd. Perhaps he should have called those countries “highly dysfunctional hellholes.” Whatever he called them, he would have been persecuted by the press, fake news or otherwise mainstream media. Let’s see: So far he has been accused of tax evasion, sexism, collusion with the enemy, war mongering, being mentally and physically unfit, and now being a profane racist.What a resume. The guy’s only been on the job a year.Recently, I watched a show on that new comedy channel, otherwise know as CNN, starring Dom Lemon as the dumbest man on Earth and his left-wing cartoon-like guests. It was a riot. You see, the left is never going to get over the fact that “satin in a pantsuit” wasn’t elected president.Whatever will they do when the greatest president ever, Donald J. Trump, is re-elected in 2020? Their empty little heads will probably explode.Ray WeidmanLathamMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusAlbany County warns of COVID increaselast_img read more

Editorial on pollution notification missed mark

first_imgTransparency is vital in public works and we therefore provided notification of our findings well in advance of the deadline set forth by the NYSDOH.We received the final notification and instructions from the Department of Health on January 3, 2018, and issued our statement to the public on January 8, 2018.  The state had given the CPWA until January 20th to provide notification, but we felt it was important to address the issue as soon as we had conclusive findings to report.  The editorial’s suggestion that the public could have been alerted earlier would have not only elicited a disproportionate magnitude of worry within the community but is also just inaccurate.  Each step of the process was done in a timely fashion and in compliance with federal, state and local regulations.  Helmut GerstenbergerClifton ParkThe writer is CPWA board chairmanMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationControversial solar project goes before Clifton Park Planning BoardEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes On behalf of the CPWA, I would like to address the inaccuracies listed in the editorial published by the Gazette in its Wednesday, January 24, 2018 issue.  The editorial indicated that we knowingly withheld public health information from the community we live in and serve, an accusation that could cause unwarranted harm to our customer’s confidence in the safety of the public water supply.The CPWA does frequent sampling to ensure it is providing safe, quality water.  To remain in legal compliance and uphold our responsibility to the community, we routinely sample and test the water supply to ensure quality and compliance with all state and federal regulations, including all those established under the Safe Drinking Water Act.  All sample results are forwarded by the testing laboratory to the NYS Department of Health, where the data is examined and compliance is determined. The CPWA received results on December 11, 2017, for testing done in November, indicating that the samples from the northernmost part of its service area contained a higher level of a byproduct of the disinfection process, substances known as Haloacetic Acids (HAA), than is permitted by federal regulation.  The Saratoga County Water Authority, from whom we purchase water supplies for the affected region, immediately resampled for further testing.  The results issued on December 29, 2017, indicated that HAA levels had dropped to well below the regulatory limit.  Thanks to these follow-up efforts, the CPWA and the Department of Health were able to determine that the water had already returned to normal, satisfactory levels and did not pose a health concern.   Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Feeling gouged by Spectrum pricing

first_imgSince Charter Communications purchased Time Warner Cable late last year, I have seen by monthly bill increase by 22.3 percent, even though my scope has not changed. I do have cable, internet and landline phone services furnished in a bundle, but that hasn’t changed in years. I see the “low-ball” pricing being offered by Spectrum to new customers, but not their existing customers. I’ve tried to negotiate with Spectrum, but they will not lower their monthly pricing in any significant way. I have complained to the state Public Service Commission and attorney general’s office to no avail. I tried the FCC, but they only assigned my complaint a case number. Short of unbundling the services we have purchased for many years, I don’t have an answer to Spectrum’s “gold standard” pricing practices. Does anyone else?Douglas N. McFaddenNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:Niskayuna girls’ cross country wins over BethlehemEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

TrizecHahn Euro-head quits as Mayfair HQ goes on market

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Eddie Irvine heads for Silverstone

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Inner city

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

In the zone

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Local knowledge

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img